Agenda | Biographies

Microsoft Research Faculty Summit 2004
Speaker Biographies

Kevin Amaratunga
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
iCampus
Faculty

Kevin Amaratunga is currently on the faculty at MIT, where he was among the first contributors to the iLab initiative. Along with his collaborators, he has developed a Web-enabled shake-table laboratory for teaching structural dynamics. He has taught courses on programming in the .NET environment and on wavelet signal processing. His current research interests include the development of computational methods and tools for multi-rate signal processing and large-scale numerical modeling.

Victor Bahl
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Senior Researcher

Victor Bahl is a Senior Researcher and Manager of the Networking Research Group at Microsoft Research. Since joining Microsoft in 1997, he has worked on making high-speed wireless networking a mainstream technology. Several of his ideas have been incorporated in Microsoft�s core products. He has authored over 65 peer-reviewed papers, 45 issued and pending patent applications, and a book chapter. He is the founder and Chairman of the ACM SIGMOBILE, the founder and past Editor-in-Chief of ACM Mobile Computing and Communications Review (1996-2001), and the founder of ACM/USENIX Mobile Systems Conference. He is the recipient of ACM SIGMOBILE�s Distinguished Service Award and Digital�s Doctoral Engineering Award. He is an ACM Fellow and an IEEE Senior Member.

http://research.microsoft.com/~bahl

Patrick Baudisch
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Researcher

Patrick Baudisch is a research scientist in the field of human-computer interaction at the Visualization and Interaction Research Group at Microsoft Research. His focus is on interaction techniques that help users interact with very large displays and visualization techniques that allow users to view large documents on small screen devices.

http://patrickbaudisch.com/biography/

Ben Bederson
University of Maryland
Computer Science Department
Assistant Professor, Human-Computer Interaction Lab

Benjamin B. Bederson is an Associate Professor of Computer Science and director of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab at the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. His work is on information visualization, interaction strategies, and digital libraries. He completed his PhD in 1992 and his MS in 1989 at New York University in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Computer Science. He graduated with a BS from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1986. From 1990-1992, he was a research scientist at Vision Applications, Inc. working on miniature robotics and computer vision. Dr. Bederson worked as a research scientist at Bellcore in the Computer Graphics and Interactive Media research group, and as a visitor at the New York University Media Research Laboratory in 1993 and 1994. From 1994-1997, he was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of New Mexico.

Jos� Blakely
Microsoft
SQL Server Engine
Software Architect

Jos� Blakeley is a software architect in the SQL Server product working on server-side programmability and object-relational database features. He joined Microsoft in 1994 and was an architect for the OLE DB data access interfaces during 1995-1998. Jos� has authored many conference papers, book chapters, and journal articles on design aspects of relational and object database management systems. Before joining Microsoft, Jos� was a member of the technical staff with Texas Instruments where he developed the Open-OODB object database management system for DARPA. He has a PhD in computer science from University of Waterloo, Canada.

Pedro Celis
Microsoft
SQL-WinFS
Architect

Scott Charney
Microsoft
Trustworthy Computing Strategies
Chief Trustworthy Comp Strategist

As Microsoft Corp.�s Chief Security Strategist, Scott Charney oversees the company�s Trustworthy Computing initiative, which aims to promote a safe, private, and reliable computing experience for everyone. Charney also leads the Security Strategies Group, which works with product teams and others at Microsoft to advance the development of secure products, services, and infrastructures through the use of appropriate policies and controls, the implementation of best practices, and the development of useable security products and services. He also collaborates with others in the computer industry and the government to make computing more secure for all users. Charney�s goal is to reduce the number of successful computer attacks and increase the confidence of all users in the security of their personal computer.

Charney has a wealth of experience in computer security in the private sector and government. Most recently, he was a principal for the professional services organization PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), where he led the firm�s Cybercrime Prevention and Response Practice. He provided proactive and reactive computer security services to Fortune 500 companies and smaller enterprises. Those services included designing and building computer security systems, testing existing systems, and conducting cybercrime investigations.

Before joining PwC, Charney served as chief of the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS) in the Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. As the leading federal prosecutor for computer crimes, he helped prosecute nearly every major hacker case in the United States from 1991 to 1999. He co-authored the original Federal Guidelines for Searching and Seizing Computers, the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, federal computer crime sentencing guidelines, and the Criminal Division�s policy on appropriate computer use and workplace monitoring. He also chaired the Group of Eight nations (G8) Subgroup on High-Tech Crime, served as vice chair and head of the U.S. delegation to an ad hoc group of experts on global cryptography policy for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and was a member of the U.S. delegation to OECD�s Group of Experts on Security, Privacy, and Intellectual Property Rights in the Global Information Infrastructure.

Before working for the federal government, Charney was an assistant district attorney in Bronx County, N.Y., ultimately serving as a deputy chief of the Investigations Bureau. In addition to supervising 23 prosecutors responsible for arson, racketeering, political corruption, and economic crimes, he developed a computer tracking system that was later used throughout the city for tracking criminal cases.

Charney has received numerous professional awards, including the prestigious John Marshall Award for Outstanding Legal Achievement in 1995 and the Attorney General�s Award for Distinguished Service in 1998. He was nominated to the Information System Security Association�s Hall of Fame in 2000. That same year, the Washington Chapter of the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association presented him with its award for excellence in critical electronic infrastructure protection. Among his other affiliations, he served on the American Bar Association Task Force on Electronic Surveillance, the American Health Lawyers Association Task Force on Security and Electronic Signature Regulations, the Software Engineering Institute Advisory Board at Carnegie-Mellon University, and the Privacy Working Group of the Clinton administration�s Information Infrastructure Task Force.

He holds a law degree with honors from Syracuse University in Syracuse, N.Y., and bachelor�s degrees in history and English from the State University of New York in Binghamton.

Charney spends some of his free time learning Visual C++� for fun. He also enjoys long hikes in the woods and programming in the Visual FoxPro� database development system.

Andrew Chien
University of California, San Diego (UCSD)
Department of computer Science and Engineering
Director of the Center for Networked Systems & the Science Application International Corporation

Andrew A. Chien is the Director of the Center for Networked Systems (http://cns.ucsd.edu) and the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Chair Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD). Andrew�s research interests includes grid, distributed computing, networks, communication software, distributed systems, middleware, operating systems, compilers, and computer architecture. Current projects include Software Architect for the OptIPuter project, the Virtual Grid Application Development Software (VGrADS) project, and the MicroGrid. Previous affiliations include Entropia, the University of Illinois, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received his S.B., S.M., and Sc.D. degrees all from MIT. He has received numerous awards and recognitions for his research.

http://www-csag.ucsd.edu

Sailesh Chutani
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Director of University Relations Worldwide

Sailesh is the Director Worldwide University Relations at Microsoft Research where he is focused on partnering with universities in emerging areas of research and education to advance the state of the art. In his previous lives he worked on MSN TV where he spearheaded the revitalization and turnaround of a medium size business unit. Prior to that, he created a worldwide partner ecosystem of OEMs and ISVs capable of delivering solutions based on MSTV. He had stints at Oracle defining their XML and Internet strategy and representing the company in W3C standards, as well as at Hewlett-Packard labs doing research on problems of managing large scale distributed systems. He played a key role in starting up Transarc Corporation, which was a spin-off from CMU that commercialized distributed File Systems AFS/DFS and Encina distributed transaction processing system. He has a PhD from Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Masters from UNC Chapel Hill, and a Bachelor�s from Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur. Sailesh enjoys mountaineering, backcountry skiing, long distance running, and being a juror in documentary film festivals.

Jesus del Alamo
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
iCampus
Professor

Jesus del Alamo is Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT. His teaching and research activities are centered around microelectronics device technology. He has a special interest in semiconductor devices for high-frequency communications applications. Recently he has also been engaged in research on the technology and pedagogy of online laboratories. Jesus has received a number of teaching awards at MIT, among them, the Edgerton Junior Faculty Achievement Award and the Bose Award for Excellence in Teaching. He is currently a MacVicar Faculty Fellow at MIT.

Jon Devaan
Microsoft
CSA Engineering Strategy
Sr VP Engineering Strategy

As senior vice president of Engineering Strategy at Microsoft, Jon DeVaan manages the engineering standards used to create Microsoft�s software products. In this role, DeVaan is responsible for the strategies and direction of the software-engineering discipline at Microsoft. DeVaan is also a member of the Business Leadership Team with Chairman Bill Gates and CEO Steve Ballmer.

A 20-year Microsoft veteran, DeVaan�s extensive experience and knowledge have established him as a respected leader in the technology industry. DeVaan has held a variety of executive and management positions while at Microsoft. Prior to his current role, he managed the TV Division at Microsoft responsible for the UltimateTV� service and the MicrosoftTV software platform, and co-managed Microsoft�s Consumer and Commerce Group, where he helped design and initiate the turnaround strategy for MSN.

Previously, DeVaan led Microsoft�s Desktop Applications Division, growing the business to US$7 billion in annual revenues. Responsible for the Microsoft Office� family of applications and advanced application technologies, DeVaan led the initial design of Microsoft Office 2000, setting the direction of the product to seamlessly integrate Internet technologies and make them easier to use. In addition to serving as vice president of development and director of development for Office95 and 97, DeVaan worked in various capacities ranging from Excel software design engineer to development manager. His leadership and experience provided essential management of cross-platform technology and helped pioneer the development processes used to create Microsoft products.

DeVaan has been a guest speaker at many events of the interactive and cable TV industries, the Churchill Club, the Alex Brown Internet CEO Roundtable, and the Jupiter Consumer Online Forum. Most notably, DeVaan served as a panelist with United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan at the 2000 United Nations� World Television Forum to discuss the convergence of TV, digital technology, and the Internet.

DeVaan holds bachelor�s degrees in mathematics and computer science from Oregon State University, and holds patents in the area of simplifying user interface elements in PC applications.

Steven Drucker
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Researcher

Dr. Steven M. Drucker has been the lead researcher for the Next Media Research Group in Microsoft Research for the last four years where he has been looking at how the addition of user interaction transforms conventional media. He is particularly interested in database visualization for consumers or where art meets technology for user interfaces. While in the group, he has filed 30 patents on technologies as diverse as remotely operated personal video recorders, spectator oriented gaming, and new visualization techniques for media databases and published papers on information visualization and management.

Previously he was the lead researcher in the Virtual Worlds Group also in Microsoft Research. During his tenure there he helped architect a platform for multi-user virtual environments, filed an additional 12 patents, and published papers in subjects ranging from architectures for multi-user, multimedia systems to online social interaction. Before coming to Microsoft, he received his PhD from the Computer Graphics and Animation Group at the MIT Media Lab in May 1994. His thesis research was on intelligent camera control interfaces for graphical environments. Dr. Drucker graduated Magna Cum Laude with Honors in Neurosciences from Brown University and went on to complete his masters at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT doing research in robot learning.

His published papers have been in such areas as multi-user environments, online social interaction, hypermedia research, human and robot perceptual capabilities, robot learning, parallel computer graphics, and human interfaces for camera control.

Kyril Faenov
Microsoft
High Performance Computing
Director

Kyril is the Director of the High Performance Computing product unit in the Windows Server group, leading the HPC product strategy and implementation at Microsoft. Prior to this role, Kyril held a number of senior positions including Director of Central Program Management for Windows Server, executive staff member, competitive analysis lead, program manager of incubation, and a software developer in Windows. Kyril joined Microsoft in 1998 as the result of acquisition of Valence Research, the clustering startup he co-founded and lead to profitability. Kyril worked as a key technical member of two other clustering startups, as well as a consultant for Intel on chipset performance simulation and embedded system development projects. Kyril holds BS and MS degrees in computer science with parallel systems and computation finance focus, as well as the MBA in Technology Management from the UW. Kyril is active in the Seattle entrepreneurship community as an advisor and an angel investor. Kyril lives in Seattle with his wife Lauren and in the spare time enjoys traveling, performing arts, kayaking, scuba diving, and exploring the Seattle outdoors.

Shelly Farnham
Microsoft
Social Computing Group
Researcher

Shelly Farnham is a researcher in the Social Computing Group at Microsoft Research, where she studies computer-mediated social interactions. Her current research focuses on factors that enhance the users experience of online identity, community, and communication. Recent projects include tools that help people find each other, communicate, and share in the context of social networks: Personal Map, Connections, Point to Point, and Wallop. She earned her PhD in Social Psychology at the University of Washington, where she studied the interplay between identity, social environments, and behavior.

Dan Fay
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Program Manager

Pablo Fernicola
Microsoft
Windows Client Platform PM
Group Program Manager

Pablo Fernicola is the Group Program Manager in the Avalon team responsible for the integration of graphics, media, text, and printing as part of the WinFX platform to be introduced in the Windows Longhorn release. Previously, Pablo played key roles in the release of several version of Internet Explorer, and has several years of industry experience in 3-D graphics and multimedia, both at Microsoft Corporation, Apple Computer, and Intergraph Corporation. Pablo received a Master�s degree from the University of Florida and a bachelor�s degree from Texas Tech University, both in Electrical Engineering.

Dennis Fetterly
Microsoft
Mountain View Research
Technologist

Dennis Fetterly is a Technologist in Microsoft Research�s Silicon Valley lab, which he joined in May, 2003. His research interests include a wide variety of Web-related topics including Web crawling, the evolution and clustering of pages on the Web, and identifying spam Web pages.

Bill Gates
Microsoft
Microsoft
Chairman and Chief Software Architect

William (Bill) H. Gates is chairman and chief software architect of Microsoft Corporation, the worldwide leader in software, services, and Internet technologies for personal and business computing. Microsoft had revenues of US$32.19 billion for the fiscal year ending June 2003 and employs more than 55,000 people in 85 countries and regions.

Born on Oct. 28, 1955, Gates grew up in Seattle with his two sisters. Their father, William H. Gates II, is a Seattle attorney. Their late mother, Mary Gates, was a schoolteacher, University Washington regent, and chairwoman of United Way International.

Gates attended public elementary school and the private Lakeside School. There, he discovered his interest in software and began programming computers at age 13.

In 1973, Gates entered Harvard University as a freshman, where he lived down the hall from Steve Ballmer, now Microsoft�s chief executive officer. While at Harvard, Gates developed a version of the programming language BASIC for the first microcomputer—the MITS Altair.

In his junior year, Gates left Harvard to devote his energies to Microsoft, a company he had begun in 1975 with his childhood friend Paul Allen. Guided by a belief that the computer would be a valuable tool on every office desktop and in every home, they began developing software for personal computers. Gates� foresight and his vision for personal computing have been central to the success of Microsoft and the software industry.

Under Gates� leadership, Microsoft�s mission has been to continually advance and improve software technology, and to make it easier, more cost effective, and more enjoyable for people to use computers. The company is committed to a long-term view, reflected in its investment of more than $6.8 billion on research and development in the current fiscal year.

In 1999, Gates wrote Business @ the Speed of Thought, a book that shows how computer technology can solve business problems in fundamentally new ways. The book was published in 25 languages and is available in more than 60 countries. Business @ the Speed of Thought has received wide critical acclaim and was listed on the best-seller lists of the New York Times, USA Today, the Wall Street Journal, and Amazon.com. Gates� previous book, The Road Ahead, published in 1995, held the No. 1 spot on the New York Times� bestseller list for seven weeks.

Gates has donated the proceeds of both books to non-profit organizations that support the use of technology in education and skills development.

In addition to his love of computers and software, Gates is interested in biotechnology. He sits on the board of ICOS, a company that specializes in protein-based and small-molecule therapeutics, and he is an investor in a number of other biotechnology companies. Gates also founded Corbis, which is developing one of the world�s largest resources of visual information—a comprehensive digital archive of art and photography from public and private collections around the globe.

Philanthropy is also important to Gates. He and his wife, Melinda, have endowed a foundation with more than $24 billion to support philanthropic initiatives in the areas of global health and learning, with the hope that as we move into the 21st century, advances in these critical areas will be available for all people. To date, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has committed more than $3.2 billion to organizations working in global health; more than $2 billion to improve learning opportunities, including the Gates Library Initiative to bring computers, Internet Access, and training to public libraries in low-income communities in the United States and Canada; more than $477 million to community projects in the Pacific Northwest; and more than $488 million to special projects and annual giving campaigns.

Gates was married on Jan. 1, 1994, to Melinda French Gates. They have three children. Gates is an avid reader, and enjoys playing golf and bridge.

Joshua Goodman
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Researcher

Goetze Graefe
Microsoft
SQL Server Engine
Architect

Goetz joined Microsoft 10 years ago as a software architect after a career in teaching and research into database query processing.

Jim Gray
Microsoft Research
Research - SVC
Distinguished Engineer

Jim Gray is part of Microsoft�s research group. His work focuses on databases and transaction processing. Jim is active in the research community, is an ACM, NAE, NAS, and AAAS Fellow, and received the ACM Turing Award for his work on transaction processing. He edits of a series of books on data management, and has been active in building online databases like http://terraservice.net and http://skyserver.sdss.org.

Mike Hall
Microsoft
MED Product Management EMB
Technical Product Manager

Mike Hall is a Technical Product Manager in the Mobile and Embedded Devices Group at Microsoft. Mike has been working at Microsoft for 10 years originally in Developer Support, focusing on C/C++, MFC, COM, device driver development, Win32, MASM, and Windows CE operating system development, and then as a systems engineer in the Embedded Devices Group. The last three years Hall has been in the Embedded Devices Platforms Group, working with Windows CE and Windows XP Embedded. Hall writes a monthly MSDN column on embedded systems development and presents at a number of Microsoft and third-party events on Microsoft embedded technologies. Before joining Microsoft, Mike worked for Transdata and Fontware as a software development engineer, working on a range of embedded development projects including mag tape copying systems, printer imaging engines, CP/M-80 utilities (remember CP/M-80?), and font technologies for a number of well known printer companies.

Judson Harward
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
iCampus
Faculty

Dr. Judson Howard is Principal Research Scientist at MIT�s Center for Educational Computing Initiatives. He is architect and project manager for the iLab Shared Architecture. He played the same role for the Athena Muse 2 cross-platform multimedia environment and has directed research projects focused on intelligent distributed sensor and decision support systems. He co-teaches one of the large undergraduate computing courses at MIT. His research interests include object-oriented application design and distributed multimedia.

Johannes Helander
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Researcher

Johannes Helander is a Researcher at Microsoft, currently working on Invisible Computing with a focus on Embedded Web Services and Component Operating Systems. He wants to see computers enhance everyday life and everyday objects without compromising privacy. Topics of interest include distributed programming, real-time and energy performance, and software for next generation embedded hardware.

Tony Hoare
Microsoft
Microsoft Research Cambridge
Senior Researcher

After a university course consisting of Latin, Greek, ancient history, philosophy, statistics, and Russian language, Tony Hoare entered the computer industry in 1960 as a programmer and led an early compiler implementation for Algol 60. After recovery from a failure of a subsequent operating system project involving concurrency, he joined the industrial research division to work on the architecture of a new machine, which never reached the market.

In 1968, he was appointed a Professor of Computer Science at the Queen�s University, Belfast, and embarked on research towards the proof of correctness of computer programs, with a view to solving the problems of concurrency. He embraced the long-term ideal of a Verifying Compiler, but he realized (correctly) that it would not come to fruition until after his retirement in 1999. On retirement, he accepted an offer of appointment back in industry with Microsoft Research Ltd., in Cambridge, England.

Since then, he has been urging an expansion within Microsoft of the role of program verification technology in program design, development, testing, analysis, and productivity toolsets. He believes that these incremental market-driven improvements should be complemented by more long-term academic research aiming at more purely scientific goals, such as absolute correctness. A combination of the two styles of academic and commercial research could lead to the achievement of a Verifying Compiler within the next fifteen years—to meet the fiftieth anniversary of the first publication of the idea.

Prof. ChingYao Huang
Microsoft
Microsoft Research Asia
Wireless Research of the Microsoft .NET Center in Taiwan

Assistant Professor, Wireless Information and Technology Lab, Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan. Dr. ChingYao Huang has his PhD degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Rutgers University (WINLAB), the state university of New Jersey, in 1996. From 1995 to 2002, Dr. Huang worked as a system engineer at AT&T Bell Labs and then Lucent Technologies, Whippany, New Jersey for analyzing system performance and developing control algorithms for wireless systems. In the years of 2001 and 2002, Dr. Huang was an adjunct professor at Rutgers University and NJIT. Since 2002, Dr. Huang becomes an assistant professor in the Department of Electronics Engineering and a director for Technology Licensing Office and National SoC research center all in National Chiao Tung University, Taiwan. Dr. Huang�s research interest includes high-speed wireless multimedia, medium access controls for 3G, WLAN, and UWB. Currently, Dr. Huang has also served as Vice Chair of IEEE VT Society, Taipei Chapter and the executive committee member for SiSoft IP service center in Taiwan.

John Lefor
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Program Manager

John Lefor is currently a Program Manager in Microsoft Research defining and expanding the Phoenix Academic Program. His interest in compilers started when he was an undergraduate, many years ago, at the University of Rochester and he never quite grew out of appreciating the issues of codegen and performance. John came to Microsoft in 1990 and worked on various projects including OLE and Window 95, as well as internal Microsoft tools used for performance measurement and optimization. His most recent work on the Phoenix framework is aimed at making Phoenix an excellent tool for research and instruction.

Steve Lerman
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
iCampus
Faculty

Steven R. Lerman holds the Class of 1922 Distinguished Professorship at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is currently the Director of the Center for Educational Computing Initiatives, the research unit of an MIT-wide research center devoted to studying the application of computational and communication technologies on education. He is also Deputy Director of the Singapore-MIT Alliance, MIT�s largest distance education initiative. He served as Chair of the MIT Faculty from 1998-2001. From 1983 to 1988, Professor Lerman directed MIT�s Project Athena. He served as Associate Chair of the Faculty from 1997 to 1999 and as Chair of the MIT Faculty from 1999 to 2001. He is the Faculty Housemaster of one of MIT�s graduate residences.

David Lifka
Cornell Theory Center
CTC
Chief Technical Officer

David Lifka is the Chief Technical Officer of the Cornell Theory Center (CTC) and is an expert in Windows high performance computing. CTC, headquartered in Ithaca, NY with offices in Manhattan, operates the world�s largest Windows high-performance computing complex. Lifka led CTC�s technical move from proprietary UNIX to Windows-based industry-standard high performance computing, working with strategic partners, including Microsoft, Intel, Dell, Unisys, Giganet, and ADIC. Lifka came to CTC from Argonne National Laboratory in 1995. His areas of expertise include scheduling and resource management systems, UNIX-to-Windows migration, and HPC services. Lifka�s vision is that HPC must become pervasive and as easy to use out-of-the-box as a Windows PC to make it a viable tool for more than academics and research laboratories. The key to achieving this vision is to build on key Microsoft technologies such as SQL Server and the .Net Framework—and CTC is leading the way. Lifka is actively involved with Scidata.org, a new HPC community focused on Data-Driven Science and the issues surrounding next-generation HPC. Lifka has a PhD in Computer Science from the Illinois Institute of Technology and serves on a number of corporate and IT advisory boards.

Daniel T. Ling
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Corporate Vice President

Daniel T. Ling oversees the Redmond laboratory of Microsoft Research. Microsoft Research is dedicated to a broad program of basic and applied research in computer science and related areas. The laboratory�s mission is to advance the state of the art, develop new technologies which benefit Microsoft customers, and engage with the worldwide research community.

Ling served as director of the Redmond laboratory from 1995 until his promotion to vice president in April 2000. During that time, the Redmond laboratory grew over threefold to include research in new areas such as networking, data mining, computer-mediated collaboration, streaming media, devices, and new development tools.

Ling joined Microsoft Research in March 1992 as a senior researcher in the area of user interfaces and computer graphics. He was one of the founders of the laboratory.

Previously, Ling was senior manager at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center. He initially worked on special-purpose VLSI chips for displays and was a co-inventor of video-RAM dynamic memory. He subsequently managed departments that conducted research on advanced microsystems based on 370 and RISC architectures, and on the associated systems and VLSI design tools. One of these departments initiated work on a novel machine architecture, organization, and design, code-named �America,� that led to the IBM RS/6000 workstations. Ling subsequently managed the veridical user environments department, which conducted research in virtual worlds technology, user interfaces, and data visualization.

Ling received his bachelor�s, master�s, and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

Ling holds seven patents and is the author of a variety of publications. He was awarded an IBM Outstanding Innovation Award in 1986 for his co-invention of video-RAM. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Physical Society, and the Association for Computing Machinery. In addition, he serves on advisory committees for Stanford University, the University of Washington, and the University of California at Berkeley.

Dr. Steve Liu
Texas A&M University
computer Science
Professor

Dr. Steve Liu is an Associate Professor of the Computer Science Department, Texas A&M University. He earned his PhD degree from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1989 and his MS and BS degrees from National Cheng Kung University in 1981 and 1979, respectively. His research interest includes real-time distributed systems, networking, signal processing, and advanced embedded applications. He is actively involved with professional societies in conferences and various research projects.

Prof. Qiong Luo
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Computer Science Department
Assistant Professor

Qiong Luo is an assistant professor at the Computer Science Department, the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST). Her research interest is in database systems, with a focus on data management issues in network applications. Her current work focuses on query processing in pervasive computing and sensor networks. Qiong received her PhD in Computer Sciences from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 2002.

http://www.cs.ust.hk/~luo

Mark Manasse
Microsoft
Microsoft Research Mountain View
Senior Researcher

Mark Manasse joined Microsoft Research Silicon Valley as a senior researcher in October 2001. He has recently been working on Koh-i-Noor, a highly reliable disk array, and PageTurner, a large-scale study of the evolution and characterization of Web pages, as well as exploring applications of similarity detection to file synchronization, Web search, and spam detection. Prior to joining Microsoft, Mark worked on window systems, analysis of algorithms, distributed integer factorization, collaboration tools, and micropayment technologies. Mark holds a PhD in Mathematics and an MSc in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Chris Moffatt
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Lead Program Manager

Chris Moffatt is a Lead Program Manager in the University Relations Group in Microsoft Research. He leads a team that is engaged in building research platforms and partnering with universities to facilitate the research and development of innovative ideas and concepts in the field of learning sciences and technology. The current focus of the team�s work is the Learning Experience Project, where they are developing ConferenceXP, a research platform for investigating how to transform traditional and distance classrooms using emerging and enabling technologies, such as Tablet PCs, broadband networks, wireless infrastructures, and Microsoft .NET technologies. Chris has worked at Microsoft since 1990. Prior to joining Microsoft Research, he worked as a program manager in the SQL Server and Microsoft Learning Technologies product groups, as well as a period of time with Microsoft Consulting in South Africa.

Some highlights of his career include: As a program manager for SQL Server, he pioneered Microsoft�s entry into the world of competitive database benchmarking. He represented Microsoft on the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) and lead the effort to publish the first official benchmark for SQL Server, which set a world record for price/performance and helped win early credibility for Windows NT. He led the team that worked with SAP to successfully port SAP-R3 to SQL Server. He represented Microsoft on the technical board of the IMS Global Learning Consortium (IMS) and led the IMS working group that defined and published the IMS Content Packaging Specification, which has gained significant support and has been incorporated into the ADL SCORM specification. One of his most memorable assignments was working as a consultant on the computer systems that supported South Africa�s first democratic election in 1994. Prior to joining Microsoft, Chris worked for two years at Teklogic, a systems engineering company in Johannesburg. He graduated from the University of the Witwatersrand in 1987 with a BSc in Computer Science and from UNISA in 1993 with an Honors degree in Computer Science.

Anil Nori
Microsoft
SQL - WinFS
Software Architect

Anil Nori is WinFS/SQL Server architect in the Windows Server Systems division, focusing on storage and application platform technologies. He has over 20 years of experience in building complex database and eBusiness systems.

Before coming to Microsoft, Anil was a co-founder and CTO of Asera Inc., which built eBusiness solutions supported by a platform and tools for development, deployment, and management of enterprise business processes. Prior to Asera, Anil was at Oracle as a Database Server Architect for Oracle8 and Oracle8i database systems. At Oracle, he was involved in Oracle object-relational and extensible technology, Internet and multi-media DBMS development, and XML technology. He served on the corporate Architecture Review Board. Before joining Oracle, Anil was a Database Architect for DEC Rdb database products, where he was involved in the development of centralized and distributed DBMS products. Prior to DEC, Anil was a Computer Scientist at Computer Corporation of America. He worked on well known projects like SDD-1, ADAPLEX centralized and distributed DBMS, and Multibase.

Anil is actively involved in the database research community. He has published papers at ICDE, SIGMOD, and VLDB conferences. He has been on the program committees. He presented tutorials at SIGMOD, VLDB and ICDE conferences.

Paul Oka
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Program Manager

Michel Pahud
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Conference XP

Michel Pahud is passionate about computer science and learning technology and networking. He holds several degrees in computer science (software and hardware), including a PhD on �Performance modeling of parallel, irregular applications on multiprocessor machines and network of workstations� from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. His work has been the recipient of several awards, including the prestigious Logitech prize for an industrially oriented innovative project whilst at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology. After working for several companies and creating his own business in the field of e-commerce, he joined Microsoft in the U.S. where he was a Subject Matter Expert and Content Lead with the Training and Certification group. He specialized in writing leading edge courses on the .NET Framework and occasionally teaching them to Microsoft�s own product development teams and external people. Michel joined recently the Learning Science and Technology group at Microsoft Research were he is working on creating innovative collaborative learning applications for ConferenceXP (www.conferenceXP.com) as well as contributing to ConferenceXP networking. At Microsoft he won several awards including a runner-up prize for an innovative pen-based application he developed for the Tablet PC internal developer contest. As a hobby, he creates innovative applications for robotics and learning game engines.

John Platt
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Senior Researcher

Sriram Rajamani
Microsoft
Programmer Productivity Rsrch Cnt
Researcher

Sriram K. Rajamani is a researcher at MSR. He leads the Software Productivity Tools group at Microsoft Research. Sriram�s research interests are in rigorous design principles of software. He is interested in combining model checking with static program analysis techniques, decision procedures, and semi-automatic deductive methods for checking properties of both code and higher-level software models. Sriram obtained his PhD from UC Berkeley, and has worked as a programmer for over five years building and shipping commercial software before becoming a researcher.

Rick Rashid
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Senior Vice President, Research

Currently charged with oversight of Microsoft Research�s worldwide operations, Richard (�Rick�) F. Rashid previously served as the director of Microsoft Research, focusing on operating systems, networking, and multiprocessors. In that role he was responsible for managing work on key technologies leading to the development of Microsoft Corp.�s interactive TV system and authored a number of patents in areas such as data compression, networking, and operating systems. In addition to running Microsoft Research, Rashid also was instrumental in creating the team that eventually became Microsoft�s Digital Media Division and directing Microsoft�s first e-commerce group. Rashid was promoted to vice president of Microsoft Research in 1994, and then to senior vice president in 2000.

Before joining Microsoft in September 1991, Rashid was professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). After becoming a CMU faculty member in September 1979, he directed the design and implementation of several influential network operating systems and published dozens of papers about computer vision, operating systems, programming languages for distributed processing, network protocols, and communications security. During his tenure at CMU, Rashid developed the Mach multiprocessor operating system, which has been influential in the design of many modern operating systems and remains at the core of a number of commercial systems.

Rashid was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2003 for his work in operating systems and for innovation in industrial research.

He also is credited with co-development of one of the earliest networked computer games, �Alto Trek,� during the mid-1970s. An updated version of this game has been developed by Microsoft and has been released under the name “Allegiance.”

Rashid is a member of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Computer Directorate Advisory Committee. He is a past member of the DARPA UNIX Steering Committee and the CSNet Executive Committee and a former chairman of the ACM Software System Awards Committee.

Rashid�s research interests have focused on artificial intelligence, operating systems, networking, and multiprocessors. He has participated in the design and implementation of the University of Rochester RIG operating system (1975�1979), the Rochester Virtual Terminal Management System (1976�1979), the CMU Distributed Sensor Network Testbed (1980�1983), and CMU�s SPICE distributed personal computing environment, which included the Accent network operating system (1981�1985). He has published papers on computer vision, operating systems, programming languages for distributed processing, network protocols, and communication security.

Rashid received master of science (1977) and doctoral (1980) degrees in computer science from the University of Rochester. He graduated with honors in mathematics and comparative literature from Stanford University in 1974.

Yong Rui
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Researcher

Yong Rui is a Researcher in the Communication, Collaboration, and Signal Processing (CCSP) group in Microsoft Research. Dr. Rui�s research interests include computer vision, signal processing, machine learning, and their applications in communication, collaboration, and multimedia systems. He has published one book (Exploration of Visual Data, Kluwer Academic Publishers), 60+ book chapters, journal papers, and conference papers in the above areas. Dr. Rui is a Senior Member of IEEE. He was on Program Committees of ACM Multimedia, IEEE CVPR, IEEE ECCV, IEEE ACCV, IEEE ICIP, IEEE ICASSP, IEEE ICME, SPIE ITCom, ICPR, CIVR, among others. He was a Co-Chair of IEEE International Workshop on Multimedia Technologies in E-Learning and Collaboration (WOMTEC) 2003, the Demo Chair of ACM Multimedia 2003, and a Co-Tutorial Chair of ACM Multimedia 2004. He was on NSF review panel and National Academy of Engineering�s Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering for outstanding researchers.

Murray Sargent
Microsoft
IW-SDE-Authoring
Sr Software Design Engineer

Completed BS, MS, and PhD in theoretical physics at Yale University. Worked for 22 years in the theory and application of lasers, first at Bell Labs and then as a Professor of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona. Wrote the first ever (1969) math display program for computers and later (1980s) a technical word processor called PS. An author on more than 100 publications in scientific journals and six books: three on laser physics and three on personal computers.

Kevin Schofield
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
General Manager, Strategy & Communications

Kevin Schofield is General Manager for Strategy and Communications at Microsoft Research. His organization drives consensus on technical strategy and priorities for Microsoft�s research efforts. He is also responsible for developing Microsoft Research�s relationships with academia, customers, press, analysts, and Microsoft�s own product groups. Mr. Schofield joined Microsoft in 1988, and has worked in Microsoft Research since 1997. Over the course of his tenure at Microsoft, he worked in both development and program management for a number of products, including networking, operating systems, MSN, and multimedia authoring tools. He is a Magna cum Laude graduate of Dartmouth College with a Bachelor�s Degree in Computer Science. Mr. Schofield has been deeply involved with the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research field for a number of years. He serves on the Executive Committee of ACM�s Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction, and previously served as Chair of SIGCHI and co-chair of the �CHI 96� Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. He also is on the Strategic Advisory Council of the Computer Science Department of Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He is the co-author of two issued patents and several pending ones. Mr. Schofield lives in Bellevue, Washington with his two daughters. He is a fanatical reader, and can often be found practicing his ballroom dancing.

John Shewchuck
Microsoft
Distributed Systems Group
Architect

Marc Smith
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Researcher

Rick Szeliski
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Senior Researcher

Richard Szeliski is a Senior Researcher in the Interactive Visual Media Group at Microsoft Research, where he is pursuing research in 3-D computer vision, video scene analysis, and image-based rendering. His current focus is on constructing photorealistic 3-D scene models from multiple images and video. He received a PhD degree in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, in 1988. He joined Microsoft Research in 1995.

Prior to Microsoft, he worked at Bell-Northern Research, Schlumberger Palo Alto Research, the Artificial Intelligence Center of SRI International, and the Cambridge Research Lab of Digital Equipment Corporation. Dr. Szeliski has published over 100 research papers in computer vision, computer graphics, medical imaging, neural nets, and parallel numerical algorithms, as well as the book Bayesian Modeling of Uncertainty in Low-Level Vision. He has served on the editorial board of the International Journal of Computer Vision, as Program Chair for ICCV 2001, organizer of the ICCV 1999 Workshop on Vision Algorithms, and Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence.

Stewart Tansley
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Program Manager

Donald Thompson
Microsoft
Microsoft - SPOT (Smart Personal Object Technology)
Software Architect

I have been responsible for overseeing the end-to-end design and day-to-day management of the developers, software, protocols, and technology strategy fueling the SPOT initiative. Our launch earlier this year focused on distributing personalized content to wrist watches from Fossil and Suunto via a nationwide network of FM stations. We are collaborating with many teams within Microsoft and several OEMs to develop a wide variety of integrated products and services as well as several vertical applications.

Having developed a very small OS and CLR implementation (~250K), we have enabled a new generation of small, inexpensive devices capable of running .NET applications using Visual Studio, complete with source level, interactive debugging. We will soon be making developer kits available for hobbyists, universities, and for commercial prototyping.

During the Internet boom, I built the centralized ad serving system used by all MSN Web properties, including Hotmail, MSNBC, and MSN.com. This is a globally scalable and highly performant rules engine and inventory management system that currently delivers over two billion ads per day. Prior to joining Microsoft, I developed an automated loan kiosk and decisioning system for Citibank, a cellular billing and management system for Bell South, and wrote AI and 3-D graphics algorithms for several commercial games. Before committing to a life of software, I was a professional child actor working in movies and television. I studied music composition and orchestration at UCLA.

Hoi Vo
Microsoft
Programmer Productivity Research Center
Assistant Director

Hoi Vo is an Assistant Director in the Microsoft Research Programmer Productivity Research Center (PPRC). His team focus is on Binary Technologies (BiT) in the areas of Performance and Optimization. Professor Michael D. Smith (Harvard University) focuses his research on the design, implementation, and evaluation of architectures and compilation techniques for high-performance uniprocessors. Rajiv Gupta is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Arizona and his areas of research interest include profile guided code optimization and program analysis; software tools; performance, power, and memory issues in superscalar and embedded processors; and instruction level parallelism. Brad Calder is a professor at UCSD and his area of current research focuses on phase-based analysis, network processors, simulation methodology, and hardware/software solutions to aid program correctness.

Feng Zhao
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Senior Researcher

Feng Zhao is a Senior Researcher and manages the Networked Embedded Computing Group at Microsoft Research. He is also a Consulting Associate Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University. His research interest includes networked embedded systems, sensor networks, diagnostics, and qualitative reasoning. Prior to joining Microsoft, Dr. Zhao was a Principal Scientist and directed the Embedded Collaborative Computing Area at PARC (formerly known as Xerox PARC), where he built PARC�s research program in sensor networks. Dr. Zhao received his PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 1992. From 1992 to 1997, he was a tenured faculty of Computer and Information Science at Ohio State University. He received the NSF and ONR Young Investigator Awards and was an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellow in Computer Science. He is the founding Editor-In-Chief of ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks, and serves on editorial boards of several journals and magazines. He is the co-author of a recent book, Wireless Sensor Networks: An Information Processing Approach, published by Morgan Kaufmann. He has authored or co-authored about 100 technical papers and is a co-inventor of six US patents and five pending patent applications. His research has been featured in news media such as BusinessWeek, BBC World News, and Technology Review.

 

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