Microsoft Research Faculty Summit 2003 Biographies

Richard Anderson
University of Washington
Computer Science and Engineering
Professor and Associate Chair

Richard Anderson is a professor and associate chair in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at University of Washington. His main research interests are Educational Technology and Computer Science Education. He spent the 2001-2002 academic year on sabbatical with the Learning Science and Technology group at Microsoft Research where he led the development of Classroom Presenter.

Keith Ballinger
Microsoft
XML Messaging
Program Manager

Keith Ballinger is the Program Manager for WSE in Microsoft’s XML Messaging group. Before WSE he was the Program Manager for ASP.NET Web Services in the .NET framework group. He’s the author of .Net Web Services (Addison-Wesley) and Special Edition: Using ASP (QUE). A frequent speaker at developer conferences (XML One, Tech Ed, PDC), he enjoys wine, his wife, and song.

Jay Beavers
Microsoft
Microsoft University Relations Learning Sciences and Technology
Senior Developer

Mr. Jay Beavers has spent the last two years looking at how to apply leading edge technologies to the problem of creating an effective, interactive distance-learning environment. The initial result of this research is the ConferenceXP project, a high-quality multipoint video conferencing system build using standard PCs, the Internet2, and Windows XP. This project started trial deployment at the University of Washington in Spring 2002, and will culminate in a five-location graduate CS class in 2003. Mr. Beavers also worked at Microsoft Consulting in Media and Telecommunications, implementing the first metered Internet connectivity, and an innovative digital TV system based on MPEG-1 and PC set-top boxes.

http://www.research.microsoft.com/~jbeavers
http://www.conferencexp.com

Phil Bernstein
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Senior Researcher

Phil Bernstein is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Corporation. He previously was Architect for the meta data services in Microsoft SQL Server. Over the past 30 years, he has published over 100 articles on the theory and implementation of database systems, and two books on transaction processing. He is an ACM Fellow, a member of the board of directors of the Computing Research Association and of the VLDB Foundation, and a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

http://www.research.microsoft.com/~philbe

John Bransford
Vanderbilt University
Psychology and Education
Centennial Professor of Psychology and Education and Co-Director of the Learning Technology Center

John D. Bransford is Centennial Professor of Psychology and Education and Co-Director of the Learning Technology Center at Vanderbilt University. Early works by Bransford and his colleagues in the 1970s included research in the areas of human learning, memory, and problem solving, and he helped shape the �cognitive revolution� in psychology. Author of seven books and hundreds of articles and presentations, Bransford is an internationally renowned scholar in cognition and technology.

Owen Braun
Microsoft
OneNote
Lead Program Manager

Owen Braun is the lead program manager on OneNote and has been working on the product since its inception two years ago. Prior to OneNote, he spent five years working on various parts of MSN, eventually leading to the initial release of SharePoint Portal Server, including two misguided years during which he was permitted to write actual code. Owen originally hails from the east coast and can occasionally still be seen there reliving his collegiate a cappella career.

Felipe Cabrera
Microsoft
XML Messaging
Architect

L. F. (Felipe) Cabrera joined Microsoft in early 1996 as an Architect in the Windows NT group. He first owned Storage Management Services for Windows 2000. He then moved to the XML Web Services team where they are developing the platform for Web Service applications. Prior to joining Microsoft he worked at IBM for 12 years. Cabrera holds a PhD from the University of California at Berkeley, is a Fellow of the IEEE, has published more than 50 technical papers, and is the co-inventor in 21 issued patents. Cabrera is also a co-author of WS-Coordination, WS-Transaction, and WS-ReliableMessaging.

Scott Charney
Microsoft
R&D Security Strategies
Chief Trustworthy Computing Strategist

As Microsoft Corp.’s Chief Security Strategist, Scott Charney oversees the company’s Trustworthy Computing initiative, which aims to promote a safe, private, and reliable computing experience for everyone. Charney also leads the Security Strategies Group, which works with product teams and others at Microsoft to advance the development of secure products, services, and infrastructures through the use of appropriate policies and controls, the implementation of best practices, and the development of useable security products and services. He also collaborates with others in the computer industry and the government to make computing more secure for all users. Charney’s goal is to reduce the number of successful computer attacks and increase the confidence of all users in the security of their personal computer.

Charney has a wealth of experience in computer security in the private sector and government. Most recently, he led PricewaterhouseCoopers’ (PwC) Cybercrime Prevention and Response Practice. Before joining PwC, Charney served as chief of the Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section (CCIPS) in the Criminal Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. He co-authored the original Federal Guidelines for Searching and Seizing Computers, the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, federal computer crime sentencing guidelines, and the Criminal Division’s policy on appropriate computer use and workplace monitoring. Before working for the federal government, Charney was an assistant district attorney in Bronx County, N.Y., ultimately serving as a deputy chief of the Investigations Bureau.

Trishul Chilimbi
Microsoft
Microsoft Research team within Programming Productivity Research Center (PPRC)
Researcher

Trishul Chilimbi is a researcher in the Performance Monitoring and Analysis Group (PMA), which is part of Microsoft’s Programmer Productivity Research Center (PPRC). He received a PhD from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1999 for his work on cache-conscious data structures. His current research interests include data locality and memory system performance, runtime software checking, and low-overhead runtime infrastructures.

Alex Chisholm
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
External Relations and Special Projects
Director of External Relations and Special Projects for MIT Comparative Media Studies

Alex Chisholm is the Director of External Relations and Special Projects for MIT Comparative Media Studies. His project interests focus on media convergence, transmedia storytelling, film, theatre, and fiction, as well as on the uses of all media in education. Currently, he supervises creative development efforts and research around �paper-based multimedia� with LeapFrog Enterprises and a strategic collaboration between MIT and the Royal Shakespeare Company, exploring new ways of storytelling and theatrical experience. Chisholm managed research around the use of advertising in popular culture, working with Initiative Media to conduct a large-scale viewer study around American Idol 2 this past spring. As part of the MIT Games-to-Teach, Chisholm contributes to the development of the project�s conceptual models and research agenda. He holds a BS from Cornell University.

Will Clinger
Northeastern
College of Computer and Information Science
Associate Professor

Professor Clinger focuses on the design, specification, and implementation of functional and higher-order programming languages. His research interest stems from programming languages� ability to connect mathematically sophisticated theories of syntax and semantics to economically important details of computer hardware and software. In the course of his career, Professor Clinger has proven the correctness of a commercial compiler�s algorithm for generating code, invented efficient algorithms for hygienic macro expansion and converting decimal scientific notation into the nearest binary floating-point approximation, and contributed to development of the IEEE/ANSI standard for Scheme.

Martin Culpepper
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Precision Systems Design and Manufacturing Laboratory
Professor

Prof. Culpepper heads the Precision Systems Design and Manufacturing Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His research interests include: novel mechanisms, manipulators and fixtures for positioning and alignment solutions, integration of compliant mechanism technology into manufacturing processes, and enhancement of hands-on Engineering Education principles. Prof. Culpepper received his BS in Mechanical Engineering (1995) from Iowa State, an MS (MIT, 1997), and PhD (2000) from MIT. He is the recipient of a 1999 R&D 100 Award for work on precision automotive assemblies and he is listed on six patents issued/pending.

Randall Davis
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Computer Science
Professor of Computer Science and Associate Director of the Al Lab

Randall Davis is a Professor of Computer Science and served as Associate Director of the AI Lab for five years. He and his group are developing advanced tools that permit natural, sketch-based interaction with software, particularly for computer-aided design. Dr. Davis has been an early contributor to the field of knowledge-based systems. In 1990 he was named a Founding Fellow of the AAAI, and from 1995-1997 served as its President. From 1995–1998 he served on the Scientific Advisory Board of the U.S. Air Force. Dr. Davis has also been active in the area of intellectual property, serving as expert to the Court in Computer Associates v. Altai, a software copyright infringement case that substantially influenced software copyright practice. He was also Chairman of the National Academy of Sciences study, The Digital Dilemma: Intellectual Property in the Information Age.

Peter Drayton
Microsoft
Common Language Runtime
Program Manager

Peter Drayton is a Program Manager in the Common Language Runtime team at Microsoft, where his mission is to ensure that Rotor and the CLR is a great place for programming language and virtual machine research and development.

Mario Garzia
Microsoft
Base OS Performance
Director Windows Reliabilility

As Director of the Windows Reliability group, Mario Garzia is responsible for making Windows the most reliable and available environment for running applications in all customer scenarios. This is achieved through a detailed understanding of customer and competitive reliability and then using this knowledge to introduce architectural changes, new product features, tools, and process improvements. Prior to his current assignment, Mario was Director of Systems Engineering in ITG responsible for the development of technology platforms and Tier IV engineering support for Microsoft data centers. Before joining Microsoft in 1997, Mario worked at Bell Laboratories leading teams with responsibility for system and service performance and reliability. Mario holds a PhD in mathematical systems theory from Case Western Reserve University, his BS and MS are in Mathematics.

William H. Gates
Microsoft
Chairman and Chief Software Architect

William (Bill) H. Gates is Chairman and Chief Software Architect of Microsoft Corporation, the worldwide leader in software, services, and Internet technologies for personal and business computing. Microsoft employs more than 40,000 people in 60 countries. In 1973, Gates entered Harvard University as a freshman, where he lived down the hall from Steve Ballmer, now Microsoft�s Chief Executive Officer. While at Harvard, Gates developed a version of the programming language BASIC for the first microcomputer—the MITS Altair. In his junior year, Gates left Harvard to devote his energies to Microsoft, a company he had begun in 1975 with his childhood friend Paul Allen. Guided by a belief that the computer would be a valuable tool on every office desktop and in every home, they began developing software for personal computers. Gates� foresight and his vision for personal computing have been central to the success of Microsoft and the software industry. Under Gates� leadership, Microsoft�s mission has been to continually advance and improve software technology, and to make it easier, more cost effective, and more enjoyable for people to use computers. The company is committed to a long-term view, reflected in its investment of more than $4 billion on research and development in the current fiscal year.

Jim Gray
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Senior Researcher

Jim Gray is part of Microsoft�s research group. His work focuses on databases and transaction processing. Jim is active in the research community, is an ACM, NAE, NAS, and AAAS Fellow, and received the ACM Turing Award for his work on transaction processing. He edits of a series of books on data management, and has been active in building online databases like http://terraservice.net and http://skyserver.sdss.org.

William Griswold
University of California at San Diego
Computer Science and Engineering
Associate Professor

William Griswold is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of California at San Diego. He received his PhD in Computer Science from the University of Washington in 1991 and his BA in Mathematics from the University of Arizona in 1985. He is Program Co-Chair for the upcoming 2003 International Conference on Software Engineering, and recently chaired the 2nd International Conference on Aspect Oriented Software Development. He is a principal of the UCSD division of Cal-(IT)2, the UCSD/UCI California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology. His research interests include ubiquitous computing, software evolution and design, software tools and visualization, and program analysis.

http://www.cs.ucsd.edu/users/wgg

Jonathan Grudin
Microsoft
Microsoft Research Adaptive Systems and Interaction Group
Senior Researcher

Jonathan Grudin works in the Adaptive Systems and Interaction Group at Microsoft Research. His research is in human-computer interaction and computer supported cooperative work, with a particular focus on the design, adoption, and use of group support technologies. Prior to joining Microsoft Research, he was Professor of Information and Computer Science at University of California at Irvine. He has taught at Aarhus University, Keio University, and the University of Oslo, and worked at the MRC Applied Psychology Unit, Wang Laboratories, and MCC since earning a PhD at UC San Diego.

Mike Hall
Microsoft
Mobile and Embedded Devices Group
Product Manager

Mike Hall is a Technical Product Manager in the Microsoft Mobile and Embedded Devices Group. Mike has been working with Windows CE since 1996 in developer support, Embedded System Engineering, and the Embedded product group. When not at the office, Mike can be found with his family, or working on Skunk projects.

Jeff Han
New York University
CAT
Research Associate

http://cat.nyu.edu/current

Gerd Heber
Cornell Theory Center
Cornell Fracture Group
Senior Research Associate

In this role, Dr. Heber is responsible for developing new algorithms and high-performance software for multi-scale and multi-physics simulations. Prior to joining Cornell, Mr. Heber worked for the German National Research Center for Information Technology in Berlin, Germany and other high-performance computing research initiatives funded by government agencies and corporate sponsors from Germany, Japan, and the United States. Mr. Heber holds both a master�s degree and a PhD in mathematics from Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University in Greifswald, Germany. His main interests are in applied mathematics and scientific computing.

Randy Hinrichs
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations, Learning Science and Technology
University Relations Manager

Randy Hinrichs is Microsoft Research’s Group Research Manager for Learning Science and Technology (LST). He manages a large scale Learning Science and Technology research project at MIT called iCampus, and runs a team of research developers who are building an Internet2, mobile learning research platform called the Learning Experience Project. He is Microsoft’s industry board member on the American Society of Engineering Educators, the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, IEEE Learning Task Force, the National Science Foundation’s Corporate Foundation Alliance, ACM’s eLearning Board, and the International Network of Engineering Education and Research, Microsoft’s International Educational Advisory Board, and the San Francisco Academy of Arts Presidential Board. He is one of the pioneers of the Learning Federation, a consortium of industry, government ,and universities focused on an international research agenda for LST. He has been working as an educational technologist researcher for 25 years. He has testified before Congress for the Web Based Education Commission, participated in the PITAC Subcommittee on Learning, keynoted at many international Web education conferences, has patents pending on learning technologies, and appeared in many articles both as an intranet strategist and visionary on the Web in education. His own penchant for technologies is simulation-based technologies that enable activity-based learning, discovery learning, and game-based learning.

Loring Holden
Brown University
Computer Graphics Group
Senior Research Software Engineer

Loring Holden has worked in the Brown University Computer Graphics Group since 1995 and is currently the group�s Senior Research Software Engineer. He has published in the fields of Non-Photorealistic Rendering (NPR), user interfaces, scenegraph interoperability, and telecollaboration. In addition to working on the ReMarkable Texts project, Holden is closely involved in a project creating Immersive Electronic Books for Surgical Training.

Mike Howard
Microsoft
Microsoft Corporate Security
Director of Corporate Security

Michael Howard is a security program manager on the Microsoft Windows XP team, focusing on secure design, programming, and testing techniques. He works with hundreds of people both inside and outside the company each year to help them secure their applications. He is the author of Designing Secure Web-Based Applications for Microsoft Windows 2000 (Microsoft Press). Prior to working on Windows XP, Michael worked on next-generation Web server technologies and IIS. He has worked on Microsoft Windows NT® security since 1992.

Christian Huitema
Microsoft
Networking and Communications Management
Architect

Christian Huitema is currently working as an Architect at Microsoft, in the Windows Networking and Communications group. This group is in charge of all the networking support for Windows, including the evolution of TCP/IP support, IPv6, Real-Time Communication using SIP, Peer-to-Peer, and Universal Plug and Play (UPnP.) Until January 2000, he was chief scientist, and Telcordia Fellow, in the Internet Architecture Research laboratory of Telcordia, working on Internet Quality of Service and Internet Telephony. Prior to that, he was a researcher at CNET and then at INRIA in France, where he worked on innovative communication protocols, software, and compilers, including an IP-based H.261 videoconferencing system, IVS, doing video over the Internet in 1994.

Marty Humphrey
University of Virginia
Computer Science
Assistant Professor

Marty Humphrey is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Virginia. From August 1998 through August 2002, he was a Research Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of Virginia, co-directing the Legion Project with Andrew Grimshaw. His research interests include Grid Computing, Web services, wide-area parallel and distributed object systems, and embedded computing on smart devices. He is active in the Global Grid Forum, where he is a member of the Steering Group and the Security Area Director. He received a PhD in Computer Science from the University of Massachusetts in 1996.

Henry Jenkins
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Humanities and Comparative Media Studies
Professorship of Humanities and Director of MIT Compartive Media Studies

Henry Jenkins, the John E. Burchard Professorship of Humanities and Director of MIT Comparative Media Studies, has spent his career studying media and the way people incorporate it into their lives. He is the principle investigator for the MIT-Microsoft Games-to-Teach project, which is examining the educational potential of computer and video games. He writes a regular column, �The Digital Renaissance,� for Technology Review magazine and is currently writing a book designed to explain “why media change matters.” He testified in 1999 before the U.S. Senate during the hearings on media violence that followed the Littleton, Colorado shootings, testified before the Federal Communications Commission about media literacy, and spoke to the governor�s board of the World Economic Forum about intellectual property law. His books include Hop on Pop: The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture (co-edited with Tara McPherson and Jane Shattuc, 2003), From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer Games (co-editor with Justine Cassell, 1998), The Children�s Cultural Reader (editor, 1998), Science Fiction Audiences: Doctor Who, Star Trek and Their Followers (with John Tullock, 1995), Classical Hollywood Comedy (co-editor with Kristine Brunovska Karnick, 1994), Textual Poachers: Television Fans and Participatory Culture (1992), What Made Pistachio Nuts?: Early Sound Comedy and the Vaudeville Aesthetic (1992), and the forthcoming The Politics and Pleasures of Popular Culture. Jenkins earned his doctorate in communication arts from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and a master�s degree in communication studies from the University of Iowa.

Henry Kelly
Federation of American Scientists

Eric Klopfer
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Science Education and Educational Technology
Director of the MIT Teacher Education Program, and the Scheller Career Development Professor of Science Education and Educational Technology

Eric Klopfer is the Director of the MIT Teacher Education Program, and the Scheller Career Development Professor of Science Education and Educational Technology at MIT.�Klopfer’s research focuses on the development and use of computer games and simulations for building understanding of science and complex systems.�His research projects include StarLogo, a desktop platform that enables students and teachers to create computer simulations of complex systems, as well as location aware and participatory simulations on handheld (Palm and Pocket PC) and wearable computers. Klopfer’s work combines the construction of new software tools with research and development of new pedagogical supports that support the use of these tools in the classroom.�He is the co-author of the book, “Adventures in Modeling: Exploring Complex, Dynamic Systems with StarLogo.”

David Ladd
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Manager, External Research Programs—Trustworthy Computing

David Ladd has worked at Microsoft for 13 years in a variety of technical and management roles. He has been in his current role focusing on the expansion of security research and education since 1997. David is the co-founder of the Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board, a group created to expand the interactions between Microsoft and the academic security research community. He serves on a number of external advisory boards and committees, is an associate editor of IEEE Security and Privacy magazine, and is a member of ACM, IEEE, and USENIX. He earned his BS and MBA at Oregon State University.

Jim Larus
Microsoft
Microsoft Research, Software Productivity Tools (SPT)
Senior Researcher

Jim Larus is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, leading the Software Productivity Tools (SPT) research group. His previous research applied programming language and compiler technology to a wide range of problems, most notably efficient program measurement and fine-grain distributed shared memory. He is now working on applying this approach and technologies to improve software development. An SPT goal is to develop and demonstrate new tools for program design, coding, debugging, and tests that fundamentally improve software development.

John Lefor
Microsoft
Microsoft Research, Programmer Productivity Research Center (PPRC)
Group Manager

John Lefor joined Microsoft in 1990 and since then has contributed in the strategic development of various products and research projects. In his current position as a Group Manager in Microsoft Research’s Programmer Productivity Research Center (PPRC), he is leading the efforts in establishing Phoenix as a solid framework for research and tools development—for the academic community as well as the general software engineering environment. In addition, John is also responsible for making PPRC-developed tools and technologies available to developers outside of Microsoft through a partnership between PPRC and Developer Division.

Mark Lewin
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Manager, University Research Programs

Mark Lewin is Manager, Academic Research Programs in the University Relations Group of Microsoft Research. An eight-year veteran of Microsoft, he supports university research in the areas of compilers and runtime internals focusing on the .NET Common Language Runtime as well as high-performance computing initiatives including Grid Computing. Prior to joining Microsoft Research, Mark worked closely with the UNIX software developer community through Microsoft Developer Relations initiatives. Mark was also Program Manager for Microsoft�s RPC technologies, the �Cairo� project, and Microsoft LAN Manager.

Daniel T. Ling
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Vice President, Microsoft Research

Daniel T. Ling is Vice President of Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington. He is dedicated to basic and applied research in computer science. His goal is to contribute to the development of new technologies, such as the Microsoft® .NET Platform, that will be key elements in the future of computing. Ling served as director of the Redmond, Wash., laboratory from 1995 until his promotion to Vice President in April 2000. During that time, the Redmond laboratory grew over threefold to include research in new areas such as networking, data mining, computer-mediated collaboration, streaming media, devices and new development tools. Ling joined Microsoft Research in March 1992 as a senior researcher in the area of user interfaces and computer graphics. He was one of the founders of the laboratory. Ling received his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

Hod Lipson
Cornell University
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Computing and Information Science
Assistant Professor

Hod Lipson is an Assistant Professor at Cornell University Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Computing and Information Science. He joined Cornell in 2001 after spending two years as a postdoctoral researcher at Brandeis University�s Computer Science Department, working on evolutionary robotics, and a Lecturer at MIT�s Mechanical Engineering Department, working in design automation. Lipson�s PhD research was on the reconstruction of a three dimensional object from a single freehand sketch, as a means for human-computer interaction for CAD. His research is in the area of Computer Aided Design and Manufacturing and he now directs the Computational Synthesis Lab at Cornell.

Chris Moffatt
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations, Learning Sciences and Technology (LST)
Lead Program Manager

Chris Moffatt is the Lead Program Manager in the Learning Sciences and Technology group in Microsoft Research. He leads a team that is engaged in building research platforms and partnering with research organizations to facilitate the implementation of innovative ideas and concepts in the field of learning sciences and technology. The current focus of the team�s work is ConferenceXP and the Learning Experience Project. Chris has worked at Microsoft since 1990. Prior to working in Microsoft Research, Chris worked as a program manager in two product development groups: SQL Server and Microsoft Learning Technologies. Highlights of his work career include: He represented Microsoft on the Transaction Processing Council (TPC) and was responsible for the first published benchmark for SQL Server, which set a world record for price/performance and helped win early credibility for Windows NT. He served as the Microsoft Representative on the IMS Technical Board and played a leadership role within IMS to define and publish the IMS Content Packaging Specification, which has gained significant support and has been incorporated into the ADL SCORM specification. He played a pivotal role in the successful port of SAP to SQL Server. He also worked as a consultant on the Election system for South Africa’s first democratic election in 1994.

Deidre Mulligan
University of California at Berkeley
School of Law
Acting Clinical Professor of Law; Director, Samuelson Law, Technology and Public Policy Clinic

Deirdre Mulligan came to Boalt from the Center for Democracy and Technology, where she worked to advance privacy, free speech, and other democratic values on the Internet. In 2001 she joined the Boalt faculty as acting clinical professor and director of the Samuelson Law, Technology, and Public Policy Clinic.

Brad Myers
Carnegie Mellon University
Human-Computer Interaction Institute in the School of Computer Science
Senior Research Scientist

Brad A. Myers is a Senior Research Scientist in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the author or editor of over 240 publications, and he is on the editorial board of five journals. He received a PhD in computer science at the University of Toronto, and the MS and BSc degrees from MIT during which time he was a research intern at Xerox PARC.

Craig Neable
Microsoft
.NET Smart Devices
Program Manager

Craig has worked in several different positions in the past five years, including work in university relations in both North American and Europe. For the past two years he has worked as a Program Manager in the .NET Smart Devices group, focusing on data access, XML Web services, and other enterprise-related functionality.

Richard Newton
University California at Berkeley
Engineering
Dean of the College of Engineering

A. Richard Newton received the BEng and MEngSci degrees from the University of Melbourne, Australia, in 1973 and 1975 respectively, and the PhD degree from the University of California at Berkeley in 1978. He joined the faculty at Berkeley in 1979 and is currently Dean of the College of Engineering and the Roy W. Carlson Professor of Engineering. He is also a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, where he was Chair of the department from 1999-2000. Since 1979 he has been actively involved as a researcher and teacher in the areas of design technology, electronic system architecture, and integrated circuit design.

Jeffrey Nichols
Carnegie Mellon University
Human-Computer Interaction Institute in the School of Computer Science
Doctoral Student

Jeffrey Nichols is a doctoral student in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He is the lead student researcher on the Personal Universal Controller project, exploring how handheld computers can improve the usability of everyday appliances. He received a BS degree in computer engineering from the University of Washington in 2000.

Rick Rashid
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
Senior Vice President, Microsoft Research

Before joining Microsoft in September of 1991, Dr. Rashid held the position of Professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his master of science (1977) and PhD (1980) degrees in computer science from the University of Rochester. He had previously graduated with Honors in mathematics from Stanford University (1974). Dr. Rashid�s research interests have been in the areas of Artificial Intelligence, operating systems, networking, and multiprocessors. He has participated in the design and implementation of the University of Rochester RIG operating system (1975-79), the Rochester Virtual Terminal Management System (1976-79), the CMU Distributed Sensor Network Testbed (1980-1983), and CMU�s SPICE distributed personal computing environment which included the Accent network operating system (1981-1985). He has published papers in the areas of computer vision, operating system, programming languages for distributed processing, network protocols, and communication security.

Paul Roe
Queensland University of Technology
Programming Languages and Systems Research
Associate Professor

Paul Roe is an Associate Professor at the Queensland University of Technology, in Brisbane, Australia, where he leads the Programming Languages and Systems research group. His research interests lie in the areas of distributed computing, particularly high-performance computing and Web services, and programming languages. Paul has received over one million dollars in research funding and has published over 50 papers. Much of Paul’s research is done in collaboration with industry. For the past four years he has been working with Microsoft on their .NET initiative.

Fred Schneider
Cornell University
Computer Science
Professor

Fred B. Schneider is a professor at Cornell�s Computer Science Department, director of the AFRL/Cornell Information Assurance Institute, and Chief Scientist of New York State�s Griffiss Institute cybersecurity partnership. Schneider has a BS from Cornell, an MS and PhD from SUNY Stony Brook, and a DSc (honoris causa) from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. He has been elected a fellow of AAAS and ACM, and a Professor-at-Large at University of Tromso (Norway). Schneider is author of the graduate text �On Concurrent Programming� and co-author (with David Gries) of the undergraduate text �A Logical Approach to Discrete Math.� In addition to chairing the National Research Council�s study committee on information systems trustworthiness and editing �Trust in Cyberspace,� Schneider is co-managing editor of Springer-Verlag�s Texts and Monographs in Computer Science, and serves on several journal editorial boards. He is a member of technical advisory boards for FAST ASA, CIGITAL, IBM, Intel, and Microsoft. Schneider also serves on the NSF CISE Advisory Board and the National Research Council�s CSTB.

Kevin Schofield
Microsoft
Microsoft Research
General Manager for Strategy and Communication

Kevin Schofield is General Manager for Strategy and Communications at Microsoft Research. His organization drives consensus on technical strategy and priorities for Microsoft’s research efforts. He is also responsible for developing Microsoft Research’s relationships with academia, customers, press, analysts, and Microsoft’s own product groups. Mr. Schofield joined Microsoft in 1988, and has worked in Microsoft Research since 1997. Over the course of his tenure at Microsoft, he worked in both development and program management for a number of products, including networking, operating systems, MSN, and multimedia authoring tools. He is a Magna cum Laude graduate of Dartmouth College with a Bachelor�s Degree in Computer Science. Mr. Schofield has been deeply involved with the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research field for a number of years. He serves on the Executive Committee of ACM’s Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction, and previously served as Chair of SIGCHI and co-chair of the �CHI 96� Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. He also is on the Strategic Advisory Council of the Computer Science Department of Virginia Polytechnic Institute. He is the co-author of two issued patents and several pending ones. Mr. Schofield lives in Bellevue, Washington with his two daughters. He is a fanatical reader, and can often be found practicing his ballroom dancing.

Alex Slocum
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Mechanical Engineering
Professor

Alexander Slocum is currently a Professor of mechanical Engineering at MIT. He earned his PhD from MIT while simultaneously working from 1983-1985 at the National Bureau of Standards where he earned 12 superior service awards and a Department of Commerce Bronze Medal. He has four dozen patents issued/pending and designs manufacturing equipment for the automotive, aerospace, semiconductor, and entertainment industries. He has been involved in several manufacturing equipment company start-ups, and he has helped many different companies bring many different machine tools to the marketplace. He has also been involved with nine products that have been awarded R&D 100 awards, each for annually being one of one hundred most technologically significant new products. His research interests focus on nanotechnology, MEMS, instruments, and manufacturing equipment.

Kurt Squire
University of Wisconsin at Madison
Educational Communications and Technology
Assistant Professor

Kurt Squire is an Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin at Madison in Educational Communications and Technology. Kurt earned his PhD from Indiana University in Instructional Systems Technology and is a former elementary and Montessori teacher. Kurt�s dissertation focused on how playing Civilization III mediated students� understandings of social studies. Kurt also holds an affiliation at MIT where he works on the Games-to-Teach Project. Kurt also co-founded joystick101.org, a Web community studying game culture which has been recognized by Shift, Wired, and others as a leading center of games criticism.

Marne Staples
Microsoft
Microsoft Research, Programmer Productivity Research Center (PPRC)
Lead, Test Effectiveness Group

Marne Staples leads the Test Effectiveness group of PPRC in Microsoft Research which focuses on building reusable infrastructure enabling both test and development teams to run the right tests at the right time. She has been working in the software testing industry for over 15 years, joining Microsoft over six years ago and has been working to advance testing analysis tools and processes across the company by building highly scalable and widely adopted tools such as Magellan, Sleuth, Blender, Injector, Scout, and MaX.

Revi Sterling
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Program Manager

Revi is a Program Manager in the Microsoft Research University Relations group. She will be leading a panel on women’s retention programs in undergraduate Computer Science programs.

Frank Swiderski
Microsoft
Security Engineering
Application Security Specialist

A graduate of Texas A&M University, Frank Swiderski works for Microsoft as an application security specialist. Prior to joining Microsoft, Frank was a security consultant for @stake Inc. as well as the Department of Defense. His primary areas of responsibility are threat modeling and application penetration testing.

Stewart Tansley
Microsoft
Microsoft Research University Relations
Program Manager

Stewart is responsible�for Embedded Systems technical�evangelism as part of the University Relations team in Redmond. Before this, he was responsible�for Microsoft�s production IPv6 software�as part of the Windows Networking team. Prior to joining Microsoft in 2001, Stewart�spent�13 years in the telecommunications industry in various technical and management positions in network software research and development. Stewart�has a PhD in Artificial Intelligence applied to Engineering from the University of Technology, Loughborough, U.K. He has published a variety of papers in artificial intelligence and network management, several patents, and co-authored a book on software engineering for artificial intelligence applications.

David Tarditi
Microsoft
Microsoft Research, Programmer Productivity Research Center (PPRC)
Researcher

David Tarditi is a Researcher at Microsoft Research. He leads the Advanced Compiler Technology group within the Programmer Productivity Research Center. He is also a lead on Phoenix, Microsoft�s next-generation compiler and programming tools platform. Phoenix is a joint project between Microsoft Research and the Developer Platform Division. He received a PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon in 1997 and a Bachelor�s degree in Computer Science from Princeton in 1989.

Hoi Vo
Microsoft
Microsoft Research team within Programming Productivity Research Center (PPRC)
Research Manager

Hoi Vo is Research Manager of the Binary Technologies team within the Programmer Productivity Research Center (PPRC). He has been working on infrastructures and tools at the binary level since joining Microsoft in 1992. His research focus has been performance and program analysis, including code/data locality, compression, code streaming over the wire, and profile guided binary reordering. As managed code becomes a major driving force for future Microsoft applications, Hoi is currently looking for ways to blend together static and runtime analysis as a single framework to explore new trends in binary transformation.

http://www.microsoft.com/windows/cse/bit.mspx

John Williams
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Engineering Systems and Civil and Environmental Engineering
Professor of Information Technology and Director of Intelligent Engineering Systems Laboratory

Professor of Information Technology in Engineering Systems and Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Director, Intelligent Engineering Systems Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Principal Fields of Interest,�Knowledge Management and E-Education, and Large Scale Computation. Professor John Williams’ research is in Web-based information and computation systems applied to knowledge management and e-education. He is director of the Intelligent Engineering Systems Laboratory at MIT that specializes in developing smart infrastructure systems. He is currently doing research for Microsoft’s iCampus program on e-education systems, for Motorola on Web services for telecommunications, and for the Department of Homeland Security on GRID. He holds a MA in Physics from Oxford University, a MS in Physics from UCLA, and a PhD in Numerical Methods from the University of Wales. He has published two books and 90 journal and conference papers.

Jeannette Wing
Carnegie Mellon University
Computer Science
Professor

Dr. Jeannette M. Wing is a Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. She is the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the School of Computer Science and the Associate Department Head for the Computer Science PhD Program. She is currently on leave of absence at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington. She received her SB and SM degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1979 and her PhD degree in Computer Science in 1983, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Professor Wing�s general research interests are in the areas of specification and verification, concurrent and distributed systems, and programming languages. Her current focus is on design and measurement techniques for improving the security of software systems. She is a member of the National Academies Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and the Microsoft Trustworthy Computing Scientific Advisory Board. She is an ACM Fellow and IEEE Fellow.

Steve Wolfman
University of Washington
Computer Science
PhD Candidate

Steve Wolfman is a PhD candidate in computer science at the University of Washington and is the author of more than a dozen technical papers and book chapters in the areas of education, educational technology, and artificial intelligence. Steve has also received recognition for his teaching including the UW Excellence in Teaching Award, the UW College of Engineering Teaching Assistant Recognition Award, and the UW Undergraduate ACM Teaching Award. His work has been supported by Microsoft Research, Intel, Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs, the National Science Foundation, and Achievement Rewards for College Scientists.

Ben Zorn
Microsoft
Microsoft Research Performance Monitoring and Analysis Group
Researcher

Ben Zorn is interested in the design and implementation of programming languages for the purposes of making applications easier to program, more efficient to execute, and easier to use. His specific research interests include dynamic storage allocation, runtime performance optimizations, and program behavior measurement, characterization, prediction, and optimization.

http://research.microsoft.com/~zorn/

 

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