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Microsoft Research Faculty Summit 2002 Biographies

Hal Abelson
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Computer Science and Engineering
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Hal Abelson is Class of 1922 Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a Fellow of the IEEE. He joined the MIT faculty in 1973. Abelson was recipient in 1992 of the Bose Award (MIT’s School of Engineering teaching award). Abelson is also the winner of the 1995 Booth Education Award given by IEEE Computer Society, cited for his continued contributions to the pedagogy and teaching of introductory computer science. He was also a founding director of the Free Software Foundation, and he consults to Hewlett-Packard Laboratories. He is co-director of the MIT-Microsoft iCampus Alliance in educational technology and co-head of the MIT Council on Educational Technology.

http://mit.edu/mitcet

P. Anandan
Microsoft Research
Interactive Visual Media Group
Senior Researcher

Anandan is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research and is currently the head of the Interactive Visual Media Group. He obtained his BTech from IIT Madras in India (1977), MS from Univ. of Nebraska (1979) and PhD with a specialization in Computer Vision from UMass, Amherst (1987). He has taught at Yale (1987-1991) and was a group manager at Sarnoff (1991-1997). His Vision research has focused on motion analysis and video representations.

Richard Anderson
University of Washington
Computer Science and Engineering
Professor

Richard received a BA in Mathematics from Reed College in 1981 and a PhD in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1986. He joined the University of Washington in 1986 after a one-year postdoc at the Mathematical Science Research Institute in Berkeley, CA. He spent the 1993-1994 academic year as a visiting professor at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore India, and the 2001-2002 academic year as a visiting researcher in the Learning Science and Technology group at Microsoft Research. His main research interests are computer science education, educational technology, and the theory of algorithms.

Douglas Bayer
Microsoft Corporation
Windows Security
Director

Douglas Bayer is Director, Windows Security at Microsoft. He is responsible for delivering the core security functionality for the Windows platform and for Windows-based devices. Doug joined Microsoft in 1994 as part of the MSN service with responsibility for the delivery of Internet-based servers and services. He made significant contributions to Microsoft products such as Site Server, Microsoft Commercial Internet Server (MCIS), and other systems that Microsoft customers rely on every day. Prior to joining Microsoft, Bayer served as Director of Client/Server Development at Dun & Bradstreet Software, Director of Data Access Development at Lotus Development Corp., and Department Head at AT&T Bell Laboratories. Bayer graduated Cum Laude, Phi Beta Kappa from Knox college with a BA in Physics. He then earned a PhD in Experimental Nuclear Physics from Michigan State University. Doug enjoys spending his free time in the outdoors swimming, running, skiing gardening, and roller blading. On rainy days, he enjoys working with computers.

Jay Beavers
Microsoft Research
Learning Sciences & Technologies
Research Developer

Jay is a software developer who specializes in .NET and multimedia technologies. His goal is to radically improve the learning experience over the next few decades by introducing existing, effective technology into the classroom in an evolutionary rather than revolutionary way.

http://research.microsoft.com/~jbeavers

Benjamin B. Bederson
University of Maryland
Human-Computer Interaction Lab, Computer Science Department
Assistant Professor, Director of HCIL

Benjamin B. Bederson is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and director of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab at the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park. His work is on information visualization, interaction strategies, and collaborative applications. He completed his PhD in 1992 at New York University in the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in Computer Science. He graduated with a BS from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1986.

http://www.cs.umd.edu/~bederson

Jack Breese
Microsoft Research
Director

Jack Breese is Director of Microsoft Research in Redmond, Wash., where he oversees work on intelligent systems including speech recognition, natural language processing, and conversational user interfaces. Previously, Breese was a founding member of the Decision Theory and Adaptive Systems research group at Microsoft Corp., which develops basic technologies and tools for user modeling, intelligent diagnostics, adaptive systems, and data mining. Breese received a doctorate from the department of engineering-economic systems and operations research at Stanford University in 1987 and joined Microsoft Research in March of 1993. Before joining Microsoft, he was a research scientist at the Rockwell Science Center Palo Alto Lab and a founder at Knowledge Industries Inc. Breese was born and raised in Southold, LI, New York.

Amy Bruckman
Georgia Institute of Technology
College of Computing
Assistant Professor

Amy Bruckman is an Assistant Professor in the College of Computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She and her students in the Electronic Learning Communities research group do research on online communities and education. Amy received her PhD from the MIT Media Lab’s Epistemology and Learning group in 1997, and her BA in physics from Harvard in 1987.

http://www.cc.gatech.edu/elc/

David Campbell
Microsoft Corporation
Windows CE Core OS Team
Lead Program Manager

David Campbell is the Lead Program Manager for Networking and Communications on the Windows CE core OS team. David has been with Microsoft for eight years, most of which was spent working on Windows CE. Before joining Microsoft, David worked for a number of ISVs developing software for Windows and has developing Windows software since 1987. David holds both a Bachelors degree and a Masters degree in Computer Science.

Lili Cheng
Microsoft Research
Social Computing Group
Group Manager

My group focuses on the design and development of social user interfaces. Since joining Microsoft Research in 1995, my projects include Sapphire: Next Generation Windows User Experience and the Virtual Worlds Platform. Prior to Microsoft, while in the Human Interface Group at Apple, I worked on QuickTime VR and QuickTime Conferencing. I am also a registered architect and actively participate in the NYU, Harvard, and MIT design schools.

http://research.microsoft.com/~lilich/

Mary Czerwinski
Microsoft Research
Large Display User Experience
Researcher

Dr. Mary Czerwinski is a Research Manager in the Large Display User Experience group at Microsoft Research. Her research interests involve the redesign of graphical user interfaces for large display surfaces, including the perceptual and cognitive issues revolving around focus plus context visualizations and task switching. Mary is currently an affiliate faculty member in Psychology at the University of Washington. Prior to Microsoft, she held positions in usability engineering and applied psychology at Compaq Computer Corporation, Rice University, Lockheed Engineering and Sciences, and Bell Communications Research. She is an active member of the international HCI and Human Factors communities, and has published many scientific articles in the field.

http://www.research.microsoft.com/users/marycz

Manuvir Das
Microsoft Research
Programmer Productivity Research Center
Researcher

Manuvir Das is a Researcher in the Programmer Productivity Research Center at Microsoft Research. His primary research interests are programming languages and compilers, and their application to software reliability. Manuvir holds a BTech from the Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay, and an MS and PhD in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. He leads the ESP (Error Detection via Scalable Program Analysis) group at Microsoft Research.

http://research.microsoft.com/esp

Michael Day
Microsoft Corporation
Windows Embedded Group
Lead Program Manager

Michael Day is a Lead Program Manager in the Windows Embedded product unit at Microsoft, responsible for the tools provided in the Windows Embedded project. He has more than 15 years of industry experience, working at both startups and large companies on a wide variety of projects including programming environments, document management systems, databases, and editors. Michael has a PhD in Theoretical Physics from Cambridge University in England.

Craig Dewar
Microsoft Corporation
Mobile Device Division
Product Manager

In February 2001 Craig transferred from Microsoft New Zealand to the Redmond-based head office to take up a position as a Product Manager in the Mobility Division. In this role he works with leading edge Mobile software and devices. Craig’s areas of expertise includes the full set of Microsoft infrastructure products, particularly Windows 2000, Exchange 2000, and SQL Server 2000. His current technology interests include all aspects of computer security, document management, directories, wireless connectivity, and new form factor devices. Craig is a Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MSCE) and holds a BSc degree in Physics.

Cynthia Dwork
Microsoft Research
MSR Silicon Valley Lab
Senior Researcher

Cynthia Dwork received her PhD from Cornell in 1983. After a two-year post-doc at MIT, she joined the IBM Almaden Research Center, where she remained until becoming Compaq Staff Fellow in 2000. In 2001 she joined the nascent Silicon Valley campus of Microsoft Research. She has been a consulting faculty member of the Stanford Computer Science department since 1997. Most of Dwork’s research has been on the foundations of cryptography and distributed computing. Recent work extends to Web search and voting theory (they are related!).

George Dyson
Author, Darwin Among the Machines, Project Orion

George Dyson is an author, boat designer, and historian of technology whose interests have ranged from the history and prehistory of the Aleut kayak (Baidarka, 1986) to the evolution of digital computing and telecommunications (Darwin Among the Machines, 1997) and, most recently, nuclear bomb-propelled space exploration (Project Orion, 2002). James Michener described Baidarka as “a grand, detailed book that will be a standard for years to come,” Oliver Sacks wrote that Darwin Among the Machines was “a very deep and important book, beautifully written... as remarkable an intellectual history as any I have read,” and Arthur C. Clarke describes Project Orion (initially funded by ARPA in 1958) as “one of the most awesome ‘might have beens’ (and may yet be’s!) of the Space Age... essential reading for engineers/scientists involved with government bureaucracies and the notorious Military Industrial Complex... also vice versa.” Dyson, now affiliated with Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, avoided higher education, but, either because of or despite his career as a boat builder, has always managed to find time for academic pursuits.

Ian Foster
Argonne National Laboratory
Mathematics and Computer Science
Senior Scientist

Ian Foster is a senior scientist and associate division director in Argonne National Laboratory’s mathematics and computer science division, a professor in the University of Chicago’s department of computer science, and a senior fellow in the Argonne-Chicago Computation Institute.

http://www.mcs.anl.gov/~foster/

William H. Gates
Microsoft Corporation
Chairman and Chief Software Architect

William (Bill) H. Gates is chairman and chief software architect of Microsoft Corporation, the worldwide leader in software, services, and Internet technologies for personal and business computing. Microsoft employs more than 40,000 people in 60 countries. In 1973, Gates entered Harvard University as a freshman, where he lived down the hall from Steve Ballmer, now Microsoft’s chief executive officer. While at Harvard, Gates developed a version of the programming language BASIC for the first microcomputer—the MITS Altair. In his junior year, Gates left Harvard to devote his energies to Microsoft, a company he had begun in 1975 with his childhood friend Paul Allen. Guided by a belief that the computer would be a valuable tool on every office desktop and in every home, they began developing software for personal computers. Gates’ foresight and his vision for personal computing have been central to the success of Microsoft and the software industry. Under Gates’ leadership, Microsoft’s mission has been to continually advance and improve software technology, and to make it easier, more cost effective, and more enjoyable for people to use computers. The company is committed to a long-term view, reflected in its investment of more than $4 billion on research and development in the current fiscal year.

Peter Hallam
Microsoft Corporation
VC# .NET Development
Software Design Engineer

Peter has been a developer on the C# compiler since early 1999. He graduated with a BS Math with Computer Science major from the University of Waterloo in 1994. He joined Microsoft in January 1997 working on Windows CE and Windows NT before joining the developer tools team in 1999. He is currently working on the next release of the C# compiler.

Randy J. Hinrichs
Microsoft Research
University Relations, Learning Science and Technology
Group Research Manager

The Learning Science and Technology (LST) group works on innovative learning technology solutions over Internet 2, including high-quality video conferencing, Tablet PC feedback systems for students and faculty, and game-based engineering education. Randy supports Microsoft Research’s large scale research project in Learning Science and Technology at MIT, managing a group of software developers building next-generation learning Web services, and is expanding research efforts in LST with universities, government, and industry in an effort called the Learning Federation. Randy is a board member on the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, IEEE Learning Task Force, and the International Network of Engineering Education and Research. His own penchant for technologies is simulation-based technologies that enable activity-based learning, discovery learning, and game-based learning.

Hugues Hoppe
Microsoft Research
Researcher

Hugues Hoppe is a researcher in the Computer Graphics Group at Microsoft Research. His primary interests lie in the acquisition, representation, and rendering of geometric models. For his PhD work on surface reconstruction from 3-D scans, he was selected as a finalist in the 1995 Discover Awards for Technological Innovation. He subsequently developed multiresolution representations for geometry, including piecewise smooth subdivision surfaces, progressive meshes, progressive simplicial complexes, displaced subdivision surfaces, and geometry images. Most recently, his research efforts have focused on surface parametrizations, to exploit the new rasterization features of graphics hardware. Contributions include lapped textures, normal-shooting parametrization, geometric-stretch minimization, hierarchical solvers, and signal-specialized parametrization. His publications include 16 papers at ACM SIGGRAPH. He received a BS summa cum laude in electrical engineering in 1989 from the University of Washington, and a PhD in computer science from the University of Washington in 1994.

Scott Horn
Microsoft Corporation
Embedded and Appliance Platforms Group

Scott is currently Director of Marketing in Microsoft’s Embedded and Appliance Platforms Group. He has previously managed teams of program managers and product managers in Microsoft and worked on numerous desktop and embedded tool products. He has also developed software professionally on a number of embedded and computing platforms in the telecommunications industry. He has an MBA from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and a BS in Information and Computer Science from Georgia Tech.

Marty Humphrey
University of Virginia
Computer Science Department
Assistant Professor

Marty Humphrey is an Assistant Professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of Virginia. He received his PhD from the University of Massachusetts in 1996. He is a member of the Global Grid Forum Steering Committee. His research interests include High Performance Computing, Grid Computing, Grid and Web Security, and the integration of Grid Computing and small devices.

http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~humphrey/

Henry Jenkins
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Comparative Media Studies
Co-Principal Investigator: Games to Teach Project

Henry Jenkins, director of the Comparative Media Studies Program at MIT, has spent his career studying media and the way people incorporate it into their lives. He has published articles on a diverse range of topics relating to popular culture, including work on Star Trek, WWF Wrestling, Nintendo games, and Dr. Seuss. He testified in 1999 before the U.S. Senate during the hearings on media violence that followed the Littleton, Colorado shootings, and served as co-chair of Pop!Tech, the 1999 Camden Technology Conference. Jenkins has published six books and more than fifty essays on popular culture.

W. Lewis Johnson
University of Southern California
Center for Advanced Research in Technology for Education (CARTE)
Director, CARTE at the USC Information Sciences Institute

Lewis Johnson’s interests center on the use of artificial intelligence and human-computer interaction in education and lifelong learning. Much of his current work centers on the use of animated pedagogical agents, or “guidebots,” in interactive learning environments. He received his AB degree in Linguistics in 1978 from Princeton University, and his PhD degree in Computer Science from Yale University in 1985. He is secretary and past president of the Artificial Intelligence in Education Society, associate editor of the journal Automated Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems, and program co-chair of the First International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi-Agent Systems and the International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces.

http://www.isi.edu/isd/johnson.html

Michael B. Jones
Microsoft Research
Systems and Networking Research Group
Researcher

Michael earned his PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1992, where he was a member of the Mach project. He then joined Microsoft Research, where he is a member of the Systems and Networking Research Group. His work there has included Consumer Real-Time systems, the Rialto and Rialto/NT real-time operating systems, the Tiger video fileserver, and the Herald scalable event notification system. His interests include operating systems, parallel and distributed systems, networking, adaptive real-time systems, musical performance, outdoor activities, and his fellow human beings.

http://research.microsoft.com/~mbj/

John Krumm
Microsoft Research
Adaptive Systems & Interaction Group
Researcher

John Krumm has been at Microsoft Research since 1998. He has a PhD in Robotics from Carnegie Mellon University, with an emphasis on computer vision. Since joining Microsoft, he has worked on problems of people tracking with computer vision, visual object recognition, and location sensing using various means.

http://research.microsoft.com/~jckrumm/

Brian A. LaMacchia
Microsoft Corporation
Digital Rights Management
Cryptographic Architect

Dr. Brian A. LaMacchia is a Cryptographic Architect for the Digital Rights Management team at Microsoft Corporation in Redmond, WA. Previously, Dr. LaMacchia has held the positions of Development Lead for .NET Framework Security and Program Manager for core cryptography in Windows 2000. Prior to joining Microsoft in 1997, he was a Senior Member of Technical Staff in the Public Policy Research Group at AT&T Labs-Research in Florham Park, NJ. He received SB, SM, and PhD degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT in 1990, 1991, and 1996, respectively.

James Larus
Microsoft Research
Software Productivity Tools
Senior Researcher

Jim Larus worked in the area of programming languages, program measurement, compilers, and parallel computing as a professor at the University of Wisconsin. Since joining Microsoft Research five years ago, he established and has run the Software Productivity Tools group, which investigates new techniques for statically detecting errors in programs.

http://research.microsoft.com/~larus/

Ed Lazowska
University of Washington
Department of Computer Science & Engineering
Bill & Melinda Gates Chair

Ed Lazowska was educated at Brown University and the University of Toronto, and has been at the University of Washington since graduating in 1977. His research and teaching concern the design, implementation, and analysis of high-performance computing and communication systems. Lazowska is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of ACM, IEEE, and AAAS. He chaired the UW Department of Computer Science & Engineering from 1993-2001, and is a member of the Technical Advisory Board for Microsoft Research.

http://lazowska.cs.washington.edu/

Douglas Leland
Microsoft Research
University Relations
Director

As Director of Microsoft’s university relations program, Douglas Leland is responsible for developing partnerships with key universities, government agencies and industry partners that enhance the teaching and learning experience, inspire technological innovation, and establish Microsoft as a leading technology partner for education and research. Since joining Microsoft in July 1991, Douglas has held a variety of positions. Most recently Douglas was Director of Marketing for SQL Server, responsible for the marketing and channel development activities for Microsoft’s enterprise database products. Prior to that, Douglas served as a network and database systems engineer, working with fortune 500 companies in the New England region. Douglas graduated from the University of Virginia in 1987 and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in finance and management information systems.

Daniel T. Ling
Microsoft Research
Vice President

Daniel T. Ling is vice president of Microsoft Research, Redmond, at Microsoft Corp., dedicated to basic and applied research in computer science. His goal is to contribute to the development of new technologies, such as the Microsoft® .NET Platform, that will be key elements in the future of computing. Ling served as director of the Redmond, Wash., laboratory from 1995 until his promotion to vice president in April 2000. During that time, the Redmond laboratory grew over threefold to include research in new areas such as networking, data mining, computer-mediated collaboration, streaming media, devices, and new development tools. Ling joined Microsoft Research in March 1992 as a senior researcher in the area of user interfaces and computer graphics. He was one of the founders of the laboratory. Ling received his bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

Steven Lucco
Microsoft Corporation
Architect

Steven Lucco received a PhD from UC Berkeley in 1994 where he pursued research interests in programming language design and implementation, natural language understanding, and operating systems. Dr. Lucco has also pursued these interests as an undergraduate at Yale, a researcher at Bell Labs and a member of the Carnegie Mellon faculty. Dr. Lucco co-founded Colusa Software in 1993 and served as its technical leader. Colusa shipped to customers, including Tandem and IBM, a cross-language virtual machine that provided software fault isolation. As a development lead and architect at Microsoft, Dr. Lucco built a team that designed and prototyped novel approaches to JIT-compilation performance and program compression. This team joined with existing teams at Microsoft to design and build the Microsoft Common Language Runtime. As a senior researcher at Microsoft, Dr. Lucco has published widely-cited articles on virtual machine design and implementation. In 2000, Dr. Lucco co-founded the Microsoft Web Services Business Unit (WSBU); he currently works with this team on the goal of making distributed systems programming tractable.

Henrique Malvar
Microsoft Research
Communication, Collaboration, and Signal Processing Group
Senior Researcher

Henrique Malvar heads the Communication, Collaboration, and Signal Processing group at Microsoft Research. His team is responsible for new architectures and technologies for media processing in personal computing and collaborative environments. Previously he was Vice President of Research at PictureTel. He holds a PhD from MIT, and is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Todd Needham
Microsoft Research
Research Programs Group
Manager

Todd manages the University Relations team of Technology Evangelists. His group is responsible for working with researchers and faculty interested in applying Microsoft products and technologies in their investigations. He also manages academic source code licenses, Microsoft Research’s annual Request for Proposal (RFP) process, and external research funding.

Ken Perlin
New York University
Center for Advanced Technology

Dr. Ken Perlin’s research work focuses on graphics, animation, and multimedia. He has received numerous awards, including the 2002 NYC Mayor’s award for excellence in Science and Technology, the 2002 NYU Sokol award for outstanding Science faculty, the 1997 Academy Award for Technical Achievement for procedural texture, and the 1991 NSF PYI. Prior to NYU, he was head of software development at R/GREENBERG Associates, System Architect for computer graphics at MAGI, and a member of the Board of Directors for the NY Software Industry Association. He holds a PhD from NYU in Computer Science (1996), and a BA from Harvard in theoretical mathematics (1979). His first movie credit was for TRON.

http://mrl.nyu.edu/perlin/

Sashi Raghupathy
Microsoft Corporation
Software Design Engineer

Sashi Raghupathy has a Master’s Degree in Computer Science from Arizona State University. She is currently a Software Design Engineer Lead in the Handwriting Recognition team at Microsoft. As a part of Microsoft and SoftImage, she has shipped a number of products particularly in the area of 3-D Graphics and Post Production. In addition, she also served as a member of the Graphics Research Team at Microsoft. Her areas of interest include Computer Graphics, Image Processing, Computer Vision, Software Engineering, and Document Layout Analysis.

Richard F. Rashid
Microsoft Research
Senior Vice President

Before joining Microsoft in September of 1991, Dr. Rashid held the position of Professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his master of science (1977) and PhD (1980) degrees in computer science from the University of Rochester. He had previously graduated with Honors in mathematics from Stanford University (1974). Dr. Rashid’s research interests have been in the areas of Artificial Intelligence, operating systems, networking, and multiprocessors. He has participated in the design and implementation of the University of Rochester RIG operating system (1975-79), the Rochester Virtual Terminal Management System (1976-79), the CMU Distributed Sensor Network Testbed (1980-1983), and CMU’s SPICE distributed personal computing environment which included the Accent network operating system (1981-1985). He has published papers in the areas of computer vision, operating system, programming languages for distributed processing, network protocols, and communication security.

Ivo William Salmre
Microsoft Corporation
.NET Compact Framework
Lead Program Manager

Ivo Salmre has worked at Microsoft for over nine years focusing on development tools and frameworks. His background includes an extensive design work for Visual Basic, Visual J++, COM, and other server and client side programming technologies. For the past three years, Ivo Salmre has been focusing on development tools and frameworks targeting devices, having done work design work on Smart Cards and Windows CE programming tools. He is presently working on the design of the .NET Compact Framework and its integration into mobile devices. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Connecticut (1993), graduating Cum Laude and having been inducted into the Eta Kappa Nu Electrical Engineering Honor Society.

John SanGiovanni
Microsoft Research
University Relations
Technical Evangelist

With a background ranging from mobile computing to digital culture, John SanGiovanni is known for his unique perspective on emerging technologies. In his current role as Technical Evangelist for Microsoft Research, John manages Microsoft’s academic research funding into mobile computing and wireless technologies. Prior this role, John has had several technology learning-related roles with PPI/Knowledge Universe, and worked in entertainment at the Walt Disney Company. John’s current research focus is in interaction techniques and hardware interface technologies for next-generation mobile devices. In this area, SanGiovanni has several patents for alternative text input systems (non-handwriting, non-speech, non-typing). In recent years, John has spent his time exploring the ways in which mobile devices and wireless technologies will transform communication, learning, and entertainment.

Daniel R. Simon
Microsoft Research
Systems and Networking Group
Cryptographer

Daniel Simon holds a BMath (University of Waterloo), MSc, and PhD (Computer Science, University of Toronto). His current research areas include systems and network security. His past research areas covered cryptography and quantum computing. Daniel joined Microsoft in 1994 following a postdoc at the University of Montreal. He came to Microsoft Research in 1997.

http://research.microsoft.com/crypto/dansimon/me.htm.

John Snyder
Microsoft Research
Graphics
Researcher

John received a BS from Clarkson University in Mathematics/Computer Science and a PhD in computer science from Caltech. He has been a researcher at Microsoft for the last seven and a half years years working on new and efficient representations, algorithms, and architectures for 3-D graphics. His recent work includes generating space-efficient texture maps for surface geometry, precomputing radiance transfer over surfaces to obtain real-time self-shadowing and interreflection effects, and experimenting with point-based graphics architectures.

Kurt Squire
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Comparative Media Studies
Co-Principal Investigator: Games to Teach Project

Kurt Squire is a PhD candidate in Instructional Systems Technology at Indiana University and is currently working as a research manager on the Games-to-Teach Project. His research interests include the design of games and simulations, the use of games and simulations in formal learning environments, video game industry and culture, socio-cultural learning theory, performance assessments, and qualitative research methods. Squire also co-founded Joystick101.org, which has been recognized by Wired, Shift, and several news outlets as a leading site for the discussion of game design, theory, criticism, and culture.

Sanjay Srivastava
BITS, Pilani (India)
Computer Science
Professor

Sanjay Srivastava is presently working in the area of Network Simulation and Distributed Computing. He is interested in developing models for teaching large scale software systems. He is developing “WebLab” with partial support from Microsoft Research.

Richard Szeliski
Microsoft Research
Interactive Visual Media Group
Senior Researcher

Richard Szeliski is a Senior Researcher in the Interactive Visual Media Group at Microsoft Research, where he is pursuing research in 3-D computer vision, video scene analysis, and image-based rendering. His current focus is on constructing photorealistic 3-D scene models from multiple images and video. He received a PhD degree in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh in 1988 and joined Microsoft Research in 1995.

Marvin Theimer
Microsoft Research
Systems & Networking
Senior Researcher

Marvin Theimer received a PhD in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1986. He then spent two years with the QuickSilver distributed operating system project at IBM’s Almaden Research Center. Following that, he spent almost 10 years at Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center exploring the topics of ubiquitous computing and weakly-consistent, replicated systems. He is currently a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research, exploring topics in Internet infrastructure and peer-to-peer computing.

Andy Wilson
Microsoft Research
Adaptive Systems & Interaction Group
Researcher

Andy Wilson joined Microsoft Research in 2001. He has a PhD in Computer Science from the MIT Media Laboratory, where he studied automatic gesture recognition, computer vision, computer-human interaction, and machine learning techniques. At Microsoft, he has been working to exploit a variety of sensing technologies in support of novel user interface paradigms.

http://research.microsoft.com/~awilson/

Beverly Park Woolf
University of Massachusetts
Computer Science

Beverly Park Woolf researches intelligent multimedia tutoring systems support and on-demand advice. These systems combine cognitive analyses of learning with artificial intelligence, wireless technology, and multimedia. Tutors support the learning of visually complex processes in 3-D spaces, scientific inquiry, and numerous scientific and humanistic topics. Dozens of systems have been deployed and evaluated. They have been shown to produce real-time learning improvement and reduce cost. One system is used by over 11,000 students per semester across 20 universities.

http://ccbit.cs.umass.edu/ccbit/

 

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