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Invited Keynote

Providing Unlimited Wireless Capacity

SPEAKER
Bob Brodersen
Berkeley Wireless Research Center, Adaptrum, Inc. and SiBEAM, Inc.
http://bwrc.eecs.berkeley.edu/People/Faculty/rb/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The well known FCC charts of spectrum allocation give the impression that there is nothing available for new wireless applications that require many orders of magnitude more datarate than the audio links of the past. However, if a spectrum analysis is taken at given time and in a given direction it is found that in actual fact there is a extremely low level of use. Three solutions to solving this waste will be discussed and compared � one is underlay (such as UWB), the second is overlay (such as Cognitive radio) and the third is moving to new higher frequencies with highly directional antennas (such as at 60 GHz). These techniques are not mutually exclusive and by understanding the advantages and limitations of each one will allow us to design future radio systems that will provide the capacity we will need in the future.

BIOGRAPHY:
Bob Brodersen is Professor Emeritus in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department at the University of California, Berkeley and Co-Scientific Director of the Berkeley Wireless Research Center. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and a Fellow of the IEEE. He has received a number of technical, best paper and conference awards from the IEEE and ACM. He was a member of the founding team of Atheros and recently a co-founder of Adaptrum, Inc (Cognitive Radios) and SiBeam (60 GHz CMOS Gigabit Links).


Session 1: Research Platforms

Cognitive Radio Evolution from Agile Platforms to Omniscient Networks: the Road from Dreams to Prototypes

SPEAKER
Charles Bostian
Virginia Tech
http://www.cwt.vt.edu/about/personnel/bostian.htm
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
Joseph Mitola�s dream of cognitive radio started at the application layer, but the difficult tasks of building a radio that is aware, adaptive, and intelligent begin at the bottom of the protocol stack. How do you really make a radio that can be reconfigured at the speed required by the applications that it is carrying? How do you make a real radio usefully aware of everything important about its environment, its user, and its own capabilities and limitations, and how do such radios share and act on their collective awareness at the network level? How do you avoid security vulnerabilities in the underlying software, particularly those related to reconfigurability? We believe that the answers to these questions lie in the development, test, and validation of application and network adaptive cognitive nodes built on platforms combining the best features of GPPs, FPGAs, and ASICs plus computation accelerators. This presentation discusses these ideas and describes some of our current and developing prototypes.

BIOGRAPHY:
Charles W. Bostian is an Alumni Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of the Center of Wireless Telecommunications. He received his Ph.D, in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University and prior to joining Va Tech in 1969, he was a research engineer at Corning Glassworks and served for 2 years as a U.S. Army officer. Bostian's primary research interests are in cognitive electronics and radio system design. Currently he directs National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) projects on cognitive radio. He has authored or co-authored 45 journal and magazine articles and approximately 100 conference papers. Bostian is a Fellow of the IEEE and a member of the Virginia Tech Academy of Teaching Excellence. He is the co-author of two widely used textbooks, Solid State Radio Engineering and Satellite Communications.

RadioWare: Four Years of "Software Radio" and Applications

SPEAKER
J. Nicholas Laneman
University of Notre Dame
http://www.nd.edu/~jnl/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
This talk will overview our efforts geared at creating a software radio laboratory initially based upon the GNU Radio software and the Ettus Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP). Through several funded projects we have built portable software radio prototypes and written a new application development framework. Ongoing tasks include design of improved RF front ends and algorithm development for cooperative and cognitive communications. In addition to summarizing some lessons learned, we will outline future academic and commercial directions.
Joint work with Glenn Bradford, Alice Crohas, Michael Dickens, Neil Dodson, and Brian Dunn.

BIOGRAPHY:
J. Nicholas Laneman is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. He earned a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, in 2002. Laneman's research interests are in wireless communications and networking, information theory, and detection and estimation. He received NSF CAREER and PECASE awards in 2006, the ORAU Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award in 2003, and the MIT EECS Harold L. Hazen Teaching Award in 2001. He is a member of IEEE, ASEE, and Sigma Xi.

Building Cognitive Radios

SPEAKER
Joseph B. Evans
University of Kansas
http://www.ittc.ku.edu/~evans/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The concept of a cognitive radio, that is, a radio that senses and adapts to its operational environment, is driven by emerging capabilities in technology, improved coordination of radios through networking, and the demand for increased utilization of the radio spectrum. This talk addresses practical issues in building a cognitive radio.
Cognitive radios are enabled by advanced technologies in wideband radio frequency (RF) circuits, digital control of RF circuits, and increased processing capacity in field programmable gate arrays, digital signal processors, general-purpose processors, and ancillary circuits. We will briefly discuss the hardware organization of a cognitive radio.
A second aspect of cognitive radios is the improved coordination of radio operation. Many approaches have been proposed, including spectrum sensing, location-aware operation, brokered assignment, and distributed management of the RF resource. In this talk, we will present a comprehensive software architecture that incorporates these and other approaches. We identify the functions necessary to build a networked cognitive radio. The problems of how to insure cognitive radio operation within allowed regulations, hardware constraints, radio network protocols, and secure software updates of cognitive radios will be discussed. In particular, our software architecture will integrate the operation of a cognitive radio with more traditional networking infrastructure.
Third, demand for RF spectrum is increasing. We want more mobile communications. This demand can be address a number of ways, but the primary approaches are increasing the number of bits transmitted per Hertz of RF spectrum and taking advantage of unused RF spectrum. In the first case, we will briefly describe an experimental software defined radio (the KU Agile Radio) that can be used for communications experiments. In the second case we will describe a set of experiments and measurements that show how unused RF spectrum can be used without interference.

BIOGRAPHY:
Joseph B. Evans is the Deane E. Ackers Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science at the University of Kansas (KU). He is also the Director of Research Information Technology for KU, reporting to the Vice Provost for Research. Dr. Evans served as a Program Director at the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 2003 to 2005. At NSF, he had oversight responsibility for over $70 million in multi-organizational networking research efforts in wireless networking, cybersecurity, optical networking, and scientific applications. Further, he was responsible for over $50 million in new research and infrastructure awards in newly created programs. He was a co-founder and member of the Board of Directors of NetGames USA, Inc., a network gaming company acquired by Microsoft in 2000; XBox Live, Microsoft's Internet gaming service, utilizes the company's technology. Dr. Evans has been involved in creating several other technology companies, including a start-up that has developed and deployed TIGR (Tactical Ground Reporting System) for DARPA and the US Army. He has been a researcher at the Olivetti & Oracle Research Laboratory, Cambridge University Computer Laboratory, USAF Rome Laboratories, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Evans' recent activities include participation in the NSF Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) effort, serving as a member of the planning group and most recently as Substrate Working Group co-chair. He has been extensively involved in cognitive radio networking research, including systems prototyping and foundational science to inform the policy debate over use of radio spectrum white spaces. Dr. Evans received the B.S.E.E. degree from Lafayette College in 1983, and M.S.E., M.A., and Ph. D. degrees from Princeton University in 1984, 1986, and 1989, respectively.

Stealing from an ongoing flow: Protocols & Prototypes

SPEAKER
Ashutosh Sabharwal
Rice University
http://www.ece.rice.edu/~ashu/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
In this talk, we will discuss the feasibility and protocols for transmission by a secondary transmitter when a primary flow is active. We will also discuss preliminary results from a prototype implementation on the Rice WARP nodes.

BIOGRAPHY:
Ashutosh Sabharwal received his B.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi in 1993. He graduated from The Ohio State University with a MS in 1995 and PhD in 1999. Currently he is a Professor at Rice, where he also the Director of Center for Multimedia Communication. His main research interests are information theoretic foundations, protocols and platforms for high performance wireless networks. He is the founder of WARP project (http://warp.rice.edu) and a Senior Member of IEEE.

The Case of SDR

SPEAKER
Yongguang Zhang
Microsoft Research, Asia
/users/ygz/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
In this talk, we will discuss the feasibility and the implementation of a SDR research platform in multi-core GPP architecture. Our project goal is to provide a highly programmable platform for PHY, MAC layer and cross-layer research in wireless networking. The key challenges are how to handle computing-intensive baseband processing and satisfy the real-time requirements of MAC processing. We present the our SDR architecture and our designs addressing these challenges. We also discuss some preliminary results of our prototype IEEE 802.11b/a implementations.

BIOGRAPHY:
Yongguang Zhang is currently with Microsoft Research Asia, where he is a Senior Researcher and the Research Manager for the Wireless and Networking research group. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from Purdue University in 1994. From 1994 to 2006 he was with HRL Labs at Southern California, leading various research efforts in internetworking techniques, system developments, and security mechanisms for satellite networks, ad-hoc networks, and 3G wireless systems. At HRL, he was a co-PI in a DARPA Next Generation Internet project and a technical lead in five other DARPA-funded wireless network research projects. From 2001 to 2003, he was also an adjunct assistant professor of Computer Science at the University of Texas at Austin. His current interests include mobile systems and wireless networking. He has published over 50 technical papers and one book, including top conferences and journals of his fields (like Sigcomm, Mobicom, Mobisys, ToN). He recently won Best Demo Awards at MobiSys�07 and at SenSys�07. He is an Associate Editor for IEEE transactions on Mobile Computing, was a guest editor in an ACM MONET Journal, and has organized and chaired/co-chaired several international conferences, workshops, and an IETF working group.


Session 2: Spectrum Efficiency

Efficient Signal Identification using the Spectral Correlation Function and Pattern Recognition

SPEAKER
Daniel Stancil
CMU
http://www.ece.cmu.edu/~stancil/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The spectral correlation function can be used to detect cyclostationary signals in the presence of noise. A real-time computation of the spectral correlation function will support applications such as signal surveillance and opportunistic spectrum access. This presentation discusses the design of an efficient computation algorithm as well as the role of the spectral correlation function in the discrimination of signal modulation schemes. The number of computations and amount of required storage space can be reduced by several orders of magnitude by taking advantage of properties of linear correlation along with symmetries of spectral correlation in both the spectral and cycle frequency domains. The spectral correlation functions for various digital modulation schemes can be discriminated from one another using pattern recognition techniques. In particular, the performance of the Support Vector Machine approach is compared with that of Principal Component Analysis. When applied to a five-class identification problem in a 0 dB SNR environment, a Support Vector Machine was found to give excellent performance.

Joint work with: Theodore Trebaol and Jeffrey Dunn

BIOGRAPHY:
Daniel D. Stancil is Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Tennessee Technological University in 1976, and the S.M., E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1978, 1979, and 1981, respectively. Prior to coming to CMU in 1986, he was an Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina State University. At CMU he has served as Associate Department Head and as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the College of Engineering, as well as Thrust Leader for Optical Data Storage in the Data Storage Systems Center. He was a leader in the development of the CMU ECE department's Virtual Laboratory that was a finalist for a 1996 Smithsonian Computerworld Award. Electro-optics technology that he co-developed was recognized with an IR 100 Award and a Photonics Circle of Excellence Award in 1998. Dr. Stancil is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, and a past-president of the IEEE Magnetics Society. His research interests include wireless communications, antennas, and applied optics.

Living with Interference in Unmanaged Wireless Environments

SPEAKER
David Wetherall
University of Washington and Intel Research
http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/djw/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
Unlike cellular networks in which spectrum usage is carefully planned, wireless LAN settings are characterized by a mix of devices that dynamically compete for shared spectrum using mechanisms such as CSMA/CA. Despite much research, these mechanisms can result in either harmful interference or poor spatial reuse, problems which will only increase with more devices and greater usage. Instead of trying to control the interference before it is created, we propose to use on interference cancellation mechanisms to tolerate it when it does occur by modeling the structure of concurrent transmissions. This talk will describe our experimental work adapting successive interference cancellation techniques to a Zigbee-like physical layer, and argue why some form of interference cancellation belongs in the design of local area wireless systems.

BIOGRAPHY:
David Wetherall is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington, and Director of nearby Intel Research Seattle. He joined Intel to lead its Seattle research lab in 2006. The lab is focused on computing systems that are woven into the fabric of everyday life, or ubiquitous computing, and is comprised of researchers in the areas of network systems, HCI, and machine learning. Wetherall joined the University of Washington faculty in 1999 after receiving his Ph.D, E.E. and S.M. in computer science from MIT; he received his B.E. in electrical engineering from the University of Western Australia in 1989. His thesis research pioneered active networks, an architecture in which new network services can be introduced rapidly using mobile code, and for which he received the SIGCOMM Test-of-Time award in 2007. His research interests are concentrated in networking, including wireless networks and the Internet, as well as distributed systems and operating systems. Wetherall received an NSF CAREER award in 2002 and became a Sloan Fellow in 2004. His work on Internet mapping received the Best Student Paper award at SIGCOMM 2002 and the IEEE Bennett Prize in 2004.

Learning to Share: Narrowband-Friendly Wideband Networks

SPEAKER
Dina Katabi
MIT
http://nms.lcs.mit.edu/~dina/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
Wideband technologies in the unlicensed spectrum can satisfy the ever-increasing demands for wireless bandwidth created by emerging rich media applications. The key challenge for such systems, however, is to allow narrowband technologies that share these bands (say, 802.11 a/b/g/n, Zigbee) to achieve their normal performance, without compromising the throughput or range of the wideband network.
This talk presents SWIFT, the first system where high-throughput wideband nodes are shown in a working deployment to coexist with unknown narrowband devices, while forming a network of their own. Prior work avoids narrowband devices by operating below the noise level and limiting itself to a single contiguous unused band. While this achieves coexistence, it sacrifices the throughput and operating distance of the wideband device. In contrast, SWIFT creates high-throughput wireless links by weaving together non-contiguous unused frequency bands that change as narrowband devices enter or leave the environment. We implement SWIFT on the WIGLAN wideband hardware platform, and evaluate it in the presence of 802.11 devices, showing that it delivers on the promise of simultaneously achieving high throughput, good operating range, and coexistence.

BIOGRAPHY:
Dina Katabi is an Associate Professor in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department at MIT. She received her M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from MIT, in 1998 and 2003. She is a leader in the area of computer networks and distributed systems. Her work focuses on wireless networks, network security, routing, and distributed resource management. She has been awarded a the class of 1947 Career Development Chair in 2007, a Sloan Fellowship award in 2006, the NBX Career Development chair in 2006, and an NSF CAREER award in 2005. Her doctoral dissertation won an ACM Honorable Mention award and a Sprowls award for academic excellence.

Adapting Channel Widths to Improve Application Performance

SPEAKER
Ranveer Chandra
Microsoft Research
/~ranveer/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The width of the spectrum over which transmitters spread their signals, or the channel width is a fundamental yet under-explored facet in wireless communication. Through detailed measurements in controlled and live environments, and using only commodity 802.11 hardware, we quantify the impact of channel width on throughput, range, and power consumption. Taken together, our findings make a strong case for wireless systems that adapt channel width. Such adaptation brings unique benefits. For instance, when the throughput required is low, moving to a narrower channel increases range and reduces power consumption; in fixed-width systems, these two quantities are always in conflict. We also present a channel width adaptation algorithm, called SampleWidth, for the base case of two communicating nodes. This algorithm is based on a simple search process that builds on top of existing techniques for adapting modulation. Per specified policy, it can maximize throughput or minimize power consumption. Evaluation using a prototype implementation shows that SampleWidth correctly identifies the optimal width under a range of scenarios. In our experiments with mobility, it increases throughput by more than 60% compared to the best fixed-width configuration.
Joint work with Ramya Raghavendra, Victor Bahl, Ratul Mahajan and Thomas Moscibroda

BIOGRAPHY:
Ranveer Chandra is a researcher in the Networking Research Group at MSR. He completed his undergraduate studies from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur and a PhD in Computer Science from Cornell University. He was the recipient of the Microsoft Graduate Research Fellowship during his PhD and his dissertation on VirtualWiFi was nominated by Cornell for the ACM Dissertation Award. VirtualWiFi has been downloaded more than 80,000 times and is the third most downloaded software ever to be released by Microsoft Research. Ranveer has authored more than 20 research papers and filed more than 25 patents. He is active in the mobile systems community, and has served in the program committee of several conferences.


Session 3: Network Architectures

Architecture and Protocol Design for Cognitive Radio Networks

SPEAKER
Dipankar Raychaudhury
Rutgers, Winlab
http://www.ece.rutgers.edu/directory/raychaudhuri.html
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
Cognitive radio technology will make it possible to build a new class of wireless networks with dynamic adaptation across every layer of the protocol stack. This talk provides a discussion of architectural considerations which arise in the design of a cognitive radio network, including support for integrated spectrum management, ad hoc network formation, dynamic MAC/PHY reconfiguration and new cooperative modes, cross-layer routing, and efficient end-to-end integration with the wired Internet. A specific protocol design under development at WINLAB (called �CogNet�) based on the concept of a multi-purpose global control plane (�GCP�) is outlined. Initial protocol validation results from ongoing ns2 simulations and ORBIT testbed experiments are briefly summarized in conclusion.

BIOGRAPHY:
Dipankar Raychaudhuri is Professor-II, Electrical & Computer Engineering and Director, WINLAB (Wireless Information Network Lab) at Rutgers University. As WINLAB's Director, he is responsible for a cooperative industry-university research center with focus on next-generation wireless technologies. WINLAB's current research scope includes topics such as RF/sensor devices, cognitive radio, ad-hoc mesh networks, wireless security, future Internet architecture, and pervasive computing. He is principal investigator of the NSF funded "ORBIT" open-access next-generation wireless network testbed at Rutgers, and was co-chair of the NSF GENI Wireless Working Group working on wireless aspects of a global experimental infrastructure for the future Internet.
He has previously held progressively responsible corporate R&D positions in the telecom/networking industry including: Chief Scientist, Iospan Wireless (2000-01), Assistant General Manager & Dept Head-Systems Architecture, NEC USA C&C Research Laboratories (1993-99) and Head, Broadband Communications Research, Sarnoff Corp (1990-92). Dr. Raychaudhuri obtained his B.Tech (Hons) from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur in 1976 and the M.S. and Ph.D degrees from SUNY, Stony Brook in 1978, 79. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

A Networked Approach to Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Systems

SPEAKER
Claudio da Silva
Virginia Tech
http://www.ece.vt.edu/cdasilva/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The application of cognition to communications radios and networks opens new and exciting opportunities for improving the transmission of information. Radios that intelligently find the best operating conditions and networks that can co-exist and inter-operate to obtain common goals are just two examples of how cognition can impact (and possibly be a requisite of) future systems. At the same time that advances in software radios and related areas prove the viability of this new concept of cognitive communications systems, there are obstacles yet to be overcome. The development of practical algorithms that enable a network of radios to estimate the spectral environment in a given geographical area is one of these obstacles and is the focus of this talk. In this presentation, we identify open problems in both the physical and network layers related to network-based spectrum sensing as well as their possible solutions. The expected reliability, efficiency, and time and processing requirements of such an approach are also discussed. Finally, we present experimental work in this area currently being performed at Wireless @ Virginia Tech and discuss how this work will be used to help in regulatory and certification efforts.

BIOGRAPHY:
Claudio da Silva received the Ph.D. degree from the University of California at San Diego in 2005 and since then has been an Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech. His research interests are on the general area of communication theory and systems. Dr. da Silva received the best student paper award at the 2003 IEEE Conference on UWB Systems and Technologies, and was a graduate student fellow of the California Institute of Telecommunications and Information Technology in 2001-2002. He is affiliated with Wireless at Virginia Tech (W@VTech).

Architecture for Cognitive Networks: One Or Many

SPEAKER
Dirk Grunwald
University of Colorado, Boulder
http://systems.cs.colorado.edu/mediawiki/index.php/User:Grunwald
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
One of the primary challenges facing cognitive networks is "one radio" vs. "many". At it's core, cognitive networking is envisioned using a wide band radio. There are a number of challenges to implementing a robust, inexpensive radio with efficient modulation, RF front-end and antenna. At the same time, a single radio doesn't eliminate the physics that dictate the many air interfaces and the different networks that can be accessed. Seamless network access requires flexible physical layers but also management overlays.

BIOGRAPHY:
Dirk Grunwald graduated with a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Illinois in 1989. Since then, he has been on the faculty at the University of Colorado Science, with joint appointments in Computer Science and Electrical and Computer Engineering. His research interests include computer systems generally defined, including networking, computer architecture, operating systems and reconfigurable computing.

Network Support for Wireless Connectivity in the TV Bands

SPEAKER
Yunnan Wu
Microsoft Research
/~yunnanwu/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The FCC has announced its willingness to consider the operation of unlicensed devices in the TV bands. Compared to the ISM bands, this portion of the spectrum has several desirable properties for robust data communications. However, to make efficient use of this spectrum in a way that is non-disruptive to incumbents, there are a number of challenges that must be handled. For example, an unused portion of the spectrum must be found, and it is likely that its availability will vary over time. To address such challenges, we have developed a hardware-software platform that includes a spectrum-aware Medium Access Control (MAC) protocol and algorithms to deal with spectrum fragmentation. I will describe these algorithms in this talk.
Joint work with Victor Bahl, Ranveer Chandra, Thomas Moscibroda, Srihari Narlanka, and intern Yuan Yuan.

BIOGRAPHY:
Yunnan Wu received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in June 2002 and Jan. 2006, respectively. Since Aug. 2005, he has been a Researcher in the Communication and Collaboration Systems group at Microsoft Research, Redmond. He was with Microsoft Research, Asia, from 1999-2001 as a research assistant, with Bell Laboratory, Lucent Technologies, as a summer intern in 2002, and with Microsoft Research, Redmond, as a summer intern in 2003. His recent research interests include cognitive radio and dynamic spectrum management, wireless mesh networking, p2p networks, erasure coding, game theory, and information theory.


Session 4: Security and Applications

DoS Threats for Cognitive Wireless Networks

SPEAKER
Carl Gunter
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne (UIUC)
http://seclab.uiuc.edu/cgunter/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
This talk will consider threats to cognitive radio based on a survey of scenarios for its use in an application and possible key sharing options. We focus on understanding the tradeoffs between various options and their likelihood in specific application contexts. We sketch a few algorithms and speculate on applications in hospitals, where there is complex competition for wireless frequencies.

BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Gunter received his BA from the University of Chicago in 1979 and his PhD from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1985. He worked as a postdoctoral researcher at Carnegie-Mellon University and the University of Cambridge in England before joining the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania in 1987 and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in 2004. At UIUC he is a professor in the Computer Science Department, Director of the Illinois Security Lab, member of the Arms Control, Disarmament and International Security (ACDIS) executive committee, and member of the Information Trust Institute (ITI) steering committee. He is the head of the Systems and Networking Area of the Computer Science Department and the chair of the steering committee for the ACM Conference on Computer and Communications Security (CCS).
He does research and teaches in his areas of technical expertise: security, networks, programming languages, and software engineering. His work includes contributions to the semantics and design of programming and policy languages, models and analysis techniques for networks and security, and applications of formal logic in computer science. His current projects focus on security for networked sensors, attribute-based security systems, models and counter-measures for Denial of Service (DoS), and applications of these technologies in electric power systems and healthcare.
He is the author of more than 80 scientific research publications and patents and a textbook on semantics of programming languages published by MIT Press. He is a founder of Probaris, a company that provides identity management technologies, and has served as a consultant to research labs and companies and as an expert witness on legal cases concerning fraud, contract, copyright, and patent infringement.

ADROIT: Adaptive Dynamic Radio Open-source Intelligent Team

SPEAKER
Karen Haigh
BBN Technologies
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~khaigh/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The field of adaptable communication networks is a rich application area for artificial intelligence technology. Recent developments in software defined radio technology have opened up the opportunity to develop networks that are, in principle, highly adaptable and effective under a much wider range of operating conditions than currently possible. The networking and AI communities need to work closely with each other to ensure that network architectures are designed in such a way that they will actively support intelligent control. We present a design for a network architecture---developed collaboratively by AI and networking researchers---that exposes significant portions of the network for cognitive control in a robust, consistent manner. We also identify some of the cultural issues that arise due to differences in the approaches of the networking and artificial intelligence communities. Our project is not only the first networking architecture for network modules to expose internals to a cognitive controller, but also the first demonstration of cognitive control in a real-world (not simulation) mobile network.

BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Haigh is an acknowledged research leader in cognitive control for physical systems. She has led cognitive research in several BBN contracts for DARPA. In Self Regenerative Systems (SRS), Dr. Haigh is pioneering work to generalize instances of cyber attacks to classes of attacks. On Adaptive Cognition-Enabled Radio Teams (ACERT), she was the lead designer of the system architecture to support rapid, asynchronous cognitive control over the global OSI stack, and also designed the cognitive control mechanism that became the first known real-world system (not simulation) to use machine learning to dynamically control radio behavior. Formerly at Honeywell Labs, Dr. Haigh led cognitive control research in MANET, cyber security, the International Space Station, aircraft engines, and the homes of elders. She has developed learning techniques to recognize patterns in natural language, to recognize anomalous signals in alarm systems, and to model behaviors for monitoring and control systems. She was the PI on Honeywell's Independent LifeStyle� Assistant (I.L.S.A.), funded by NIST's Advanced Technology Program (ATP), to aid elderly people to live longer in their homes and increase their independence; I.L.S.A. was a multi-agent system that incorporated a unified sensing model, probabilistically derived situation awareness, intent recognition, hierarchical task network response planning, real-time action selection control, machine learning and human factors. I.L.S.A. was prototyped in the homes of eleven elders for a six-month field trial, and thus became the first system of its nature in a field currently heavily researched. In addition to 46 publications, Dr. Haigh holds 3 awarded patents and 16 pending patents. She is co-chaired the DARPA's 2007 ISAT study on Engineering Ensemble Effects, and is co-chairing the 2008 and 2009 Innovative Applications of Artificial Intelligence conferences.

Spectrum Aware Load Balancing for WLANs

SPEAKER
Thomas Moscibroda
Microsoft Research
/~moscitho/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
Traditionally, the channelization structure in IEEE 802.11-based Wireless LANs has been fixed: Each access point (AP) is assigned one channel and all channels are equally wide. In contrast, it has recently been shown that even on commodity hardware, the channel-width can be adapted dynamically purely in software. Leveraging this capability, we study the use of dynamic-width channels, where every AP adaptively adjusts not only its center-frequency, but also its channel-width to match its traffic load. This gives raise to a novel optimization problem that differs fundamentally from previously studied channel assignment problems. We propose efficient spectrum-distribution algorithms and evaluate their effectiveness through analysis and simulations using real-world traces. Our results indicate that by allocating more spectrum to highly-loaded APs, the overall spectrum-utilization can be substantially improved and the notorious load-balancing problem in WLANs can be solved naturally.

BIOGRAPHY:
Thomas Moscibroda is a researcher in the Distributed Systems and Security Research Group at MSR in Redmond. Before joining MSR, he was a member of the Distributed Computing Group of Prof. Roger Wattenhofer at ETH Zurich, completing his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in 2004 and 2006, respectively. His current research focus is in distributed computing, wireless networking, as well as algorithmic aspects of computer architecture and multi-core systems. He is an active member of these communities and has served on the program committees of various conferences. Thomas has authored more than 40 research papers at international conferences, including ACM PODC, ACM Sigcomm, ACM Mobicom, ACM Mobihoc, ACM/IEEE IPSN, IEEE Infocom, USENIX Security, ACM/IEEE ISCA, ACM/IEEE Micro, and ACM SODA, which represent the top-tier conferences in distributed computing, networking, wireless and mobile networking, communication, security, computer architecture, and algorithms. For his work, he has received best paper and presentation awards at ACM PODC, ACM Mobicom, and ACM/IEEE IPSN, and he is the recipient of two ETH Medals, for both the best Master and PhD thesis in his department.


Session 5: Reasoning about Performance

Breaking Spectrum Gridlock via Cognitive and Cooperative Radios

SPEAKER
Andrea Goldsmith
Stanford University and Quantenna Communications
http://www-ee.stanford.edu/~andrea/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The key to efficient use of wireless spectrum is managing the interference between users. The premise of our work is that the best way to manage interference is to exploit it, and such exploitation leads to tremendous spectral efficiency gains. In particular, we propose novel cooperative and cognitive radio methods that use signal transmissions overheard from other nodes to increase capacity. We show that these strategies have the potential for significant performance improvement over existing techniques in terms of the network capacity. Our results offer innovative ideas to improve performance in wireless networks, as well as guidelines for new wireless networking paradigms that improve efficiency of spectrum usage in both licensed and unlicensed frequency bands.

BIOGRAPHY:
Andrea Goldsmith is a professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, and was previously an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering at Caltech. She has also held industry positions at Maxim Technologies and at AT&T Bell Laboratories, and is currently on leave from Stanford as co-founder and CTO of Quantenna Communications, Inc (www.quantenna.com), which develops MIMO/OFDM wireless networking solutions. Her research includes work on capacity of wireless channels and networks, wireless communication and information theory, energy-constrained wireless communications, wireless communications for distributed control, and cross-layer design of wireless networks. She is author of the book ``Wireless Communications'' and co-author of the book ``MIMO Wireless Communications,'' both published by Cambridge University Press. She received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from U.C.Berkeley.
Dr. Goldsmith is a Fellow of the IEEE and of Stanford. She has received several awards for her research, including the National Academy of Engineering Gilbreth Lectureship, the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, the Stanford Terman Fellowship, the National Science Foundation CAREER Development Award, and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award. She was also a co-recipient of the 2005 IEEE Communications Society and Information Theory Society joint paper award. She currently serves as associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory and as editor for the Journal on Foundations and Trends in Communications and Information Theory and in Networks. She was previously an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications and for the IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine, and has served as guest editor for several IEEE journal and magazine special issues. Dr. Goldsmith is active in committees and conference organization for the IEEE Information Theory and Communications Societies and is an elected member of the Board of Governors for both societies. She is a distinguished lecturer for the IEEE Communications Society, the vice-president and student committee founder of the IEEE Information Theory Society, and was the technical program co-chair for the 2007 IEEE International Symposium on Information Theory. She has also been an elected member of Stanford�s faculty senate for three terms, and was an inaugural recipient of Stanford�s postdoctoral mentoring award.

A Greedy Asynchronous Distributed Interference Avoidance Algorithm (GADIA)

SPEAKER
Vahid Tarokh
Harvard University
http://people.seas.harvard.edu/~vahid/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
In many emerging wireless networks (such as ad hoc networks, cognitive radios, etc.), no central frequency allocation authority is available. This makes distributed frequency allocation an important but mostly unchartered territory in wireless networking.
We will first discuss existing proposed solutions to dynamic frequency allocation in different contexts, such as methods based on graph coloring and iterative water filling. These approaches either excessively simplify the interference models, or are not fully decentralized, or require too much information exchange between autonomous entities, or suffer from all these shortcomings. Additionally, they are all too complex to implement. Subsequently, we disclose a simple, fully distributed, greedy asynchronous interference avoidance algorithm (GADIA) that requires neither any information exchange between autonomous devices, nor even any knowledge of the existence of other autonomous entities. To this end, we consider a network model where the nodes are grouped into a number of clusters. Each cluster chooses its transmission frequency band based on its knowledge of the interference that it experiences. The GADIA algorithm achieves performance close to that of a centralized optimal algorithm. More specifically, it is demonstrated that the algorithm achieves about 90% of the Shannon capacities corresponding to the optimum/near-optimum centralized frequency band assignments. Additionally, it can be used in conjunction with any realistic wireless radio channel model such as those commonly employed in wireless standards. We prove the convergence of the GADIA algorithm to a sub-optimal solution, and develop performance bounds showing that this sub-optimal solution is near-optimal under various practical node activity models. In particular, using stochastic analysis, we introduce a framework to analyze the performance of the GADIA in the presence of time-varying activity rates of clusters. This framework opens the possibilities of both open loop and closed loop stochastic control to improve the performance of distributed frequency allocation.
This is a joint work with Behtash Babadi.

BIOGRAPHY:
Vahid Tarokh worked at AT&T Labs-Research and AT&T wireless services until August 2000, where he was the head of the Department of Wireless Communications and Signal Processing. In September 2000, he joined Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences (EECS) at MIT as an associate professor. In June 2002, he joined Harvard University as a Gordon McKay Professor of Electrical Engineering . Since July 2005, he is a Hammond Vinton Hayes Senior Fellow of Electrical Engineering at Harvard University, and a Perkins professor. His research is mainly focused in the areas of Signal processing, Communications (wireline and wireless) and Networking. He has received a number of awards and holds 2 honorary degrees.

Reasoning about Cooperation and Competition between Cognitive Radios

SPEAKER
David Tse
Wireless Foundations
University of California, Berkeley
http://www.eecs.berkeley.edu/~dtse/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
Cognitive radios sharing a common wireless spectrum compete for resources. They can also cooperate with each other for their mutual benefits. Reasoning about performance in such environments require a good abstraction of the physical layer which captures the fundamental aspects of the wireless medium and at the same time is simple enough for thinking about behaviors at the network level. In this talk we present such a model. Using a few examples, we show how this model quantifies clearly what is the wireless resource being shared and how much benefits one can get from cooperation.

BIOGRAPHY:
David Tse received the B.A.Sc. degree in systems design engineering from University of Waterloo, Canada in 1989, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1991 and 1994 respectively. From 1994 to 1995, he was a postdoctoral member of technical staff at A.T. & T. Bell Laboratories. Since 1995, he has been at the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences in the University of California at Berkeley, where he is currently a Professor. He received a 1967 NSERC 4-year graduate fellowship from the government of Canada in 1989, a NSF CAREER award in 1998, the Best Paper Awards at the Infocom 1998 and Infocom 2001 conferences, the Erlang Prize in 2000 from the INFORMS Applied Probability Society, the IEEE Communications and Information Theory Society Joint Paper Award in 2001, and the Information Theory Society Paper Award in 2003. He was the Technical Program co-chair of the International Symposium on Information Theory in 2004, and was an Associate Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Information Theory from 2001 to 2003. He is a coauthor, with Pramod Viswanath, of the text "Fundamentals of Wireless Communication". His research interests are in information theory, wireless communications and networking.

Model-driven Optimization of Multi-hop Wireless Networks

SPEAKER
Ratul Mahajan
Microsoft Research
/~ratul/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
I will present a systematic approach to optimizing the performance of multi-hop wireless networks. At the heart of this approach lies a simple yet realistic model of the network that captures interference- and MAC-induced dependencies. Unless properly accounted for, these dependencies lead to unpredictable behaviors. For instance, I show that even a simple network of two links with one flow is vulnerable to severe performance degradation. I will present algorithms that build on this model to optimize the network for fairness and throughput. Given traffic demands as input, these algorithms compute rates at which individual flows must send to meet the objective. Evaluation using a multi-hop wireless testbed as well as simulations show that the approach is very effective. When optimizing for fairness, it results in close to perfect fairness. When optimizing for throughput, it leads to more than 100% improvement for UDP traffic and 25% for TCP traffic.

BIOGRAPHY:
Ratul Mahajan is a Researcher at Microsoft Research. His research interests include all aspects of networked systems, especially their architecture and design. He has worked on reverse-engineering the Internet, designing incentive-compatible protocols, practical models for optimizing wireless networks, and vehicular networks. He is a winner of the SIGCOMM best paper award, the William R. Bennett Prize, and Microsoft Research Graduate Fellowship. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Washington (2005) and B.Tech. from Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi (1999).


Session 6: Spectrum Policies and Management

Collaborative Spectrum Management for Reliability and Scalability

SPEAKER
Heather Zheng
University of California, Santa Barbara
http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~htzheng/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
Dynamic spectrum access is the ideal solution to break the artificial scarcity and make spectrum available for continuous wireless growth. Instead of waiting for statically assigned frequencies, wireless devices intelligently share spectrum with peers matching their instantaneous demands. While offering great potential to improve spectrum utilization, dynamic spectrum access also imposes fundamental challenges to reliability and scalability.
In this talk, I will present our recent effort, SAFIRE, a robust, collaborative architecture for dynamic spectrum access that provides reliable and efficient spectrum access across large wireless networks. We propose to achieve reliability by statistically regulating spectrum demand to proactively avoid congestion, and by applying distributed coordination to quickly adapt spectrum usage to network and spectrum dynamics. To support large-scale wide-area dynamic spectrum systems, we also focus on light-weight mechanisms with minimum management cost.

BIOGRAPHY:
Since August 2005, Heather Zheng has been an assistant professor at Department of Computer Science, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research area includes wireless networking and communications, and multimedia computing. She currently focuses on Cognitive Radios and dynamic spectrum networks. Her research on Cognitive Radios was selected as one of the 10 Emerging Technologies of 2006 by MIT Technology Review Magazine, and the Best Student Paper in IEEE DySPAN 2007. Dr. Zheng was named as the MIT Technology Review�s Top 35 Innovators under the age of 35 in 2005. She also received 2006 World Technology Award (top 5 in communication), 2002 Bell-Labs President�s Gold Award, 1998-99 George Harhalakis Outstanding Graduate Student Award from University of Maryland, College Park. Dr. Zheng received her Ph.D. from University of Maryland, College Park in 1999 and then joined wireless research lab, Bell-Labs, Lucent Technologies. She then moved to Microsoft Research Asia as a project lead in March 2004 and later joined UCSB.

Cognitive Techniques and Spectrum management for Ultra-Broadband Cellular Networks

SPEAKER
Milind Buddhikot
Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs
http://www.bell-labs.com/user/mbuddhikot/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
The infrastructure based cellular networks, which are projected to serve 6.5 billion users by year 2013, will continue to be the dominant form of networks for foreseeable future. With wide-spread availability of 3G/4G connectivity, media-rich smart phones (e.g: iPhones) and video-intensive always-on applications in near future, we are reaching an inflection point of exploding growth in wireless broadband data services. However, cellular networks must continue to evolve to ultra-broadband access speeds in order to support future human-to-human, human-to-machine and machine-to-machine communication. This talk addresses challenges in enabling such ultra-broadband and outlines cognitive and spectrum management techniques that can help to meet these challenges.

BIOGRAPHY:
Milind M. Buddhikot is a Member of Technical Staff (MTS) in the Networking and Network Management Research Center in Alcatel-Lucent Bell Labs. His research interests are in the areas of systems, software, protocols and security for dynamic spectrum access networks, integrated public wireless networks, and multi-hop all-wireless mesh networks. Milind holds a Doctor of Science (D. Sc.) in computer science (July 1998) from Washington University in St. Louis. He is a recipient of prestigious Bell Labs President's Silver Award for outstanding innovations and contributions (March 2003), Bell Labs Team Award (Dec 2003) and Lucent Chairman Team Award (Dec 2006). He has served on program committees of several conferences and currently serves as the Editor of IEEE/ACM Transaction on Networking (TON). Milind is a co-founder of IEEE DySPAN event and has also served as CO-PI on two NSF PROWIN and NSF CRI grants and on numerous NSF panels.

Spectrum Enforcement in a Spectrum Sharing World

SPEAKER
Suman Banerjee
University of Wisconsin-Madison
http://pages.cs.wisc.edu/~suman/
On-demand viewing will be available

ABSTRACT:
Dynamic spectrum sharing systems are expected to be an important vehicle for relieving the perceived scarcity of spectral resources for wireless communication. Such a system depends on primary owners making their spectrum available to potential secondary users, potentially through a temporary spectrum lease. While this approach to leads to better and efficient spectrum utilization, the ability of secondaries to move into arbitrary spectrum opens up the possibility of mis-use. The goal of this talk is to introduce some preliminary solution approaches, combining both hardware and software constructs, that mitigate such threats.

BIOGRAPHY:
Suman Banerjee is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Computer Sciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA and heads the newly founded Wisconsin Wireless and NetworkinG Systems (WiNGS) laboratory. He received the PhD and MS degrees in Computer Science from University of Maryland College Park, USA and the BTech degree in Computer Science and Engineering from IIT Kanpur, India. His research focus is on various aspects of wireless and mobile networking systems.


Poster and Demo Session

Providing Reliability in Dynamic Spectrum Allocation Systems

PRESENTER
Lili Cao
UCSB
http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~lilicao/

ABSTRACT:
Dynamic Spectrum Allocation (DSA) using cognitive radios is a promising solution to the spectrum scarcity problem. Most solutions proposed for DSA focus on improving spectrum utilization and fairness, but ignore the impact on reliability which is a critical requirement for deploying network services. Traditional reliability requirements, such as delay and disruption ratio, are broken due to the inherent dynamic features in DSA. Because of the increased number of wireless devices, highly dynamic traffic demand and coexistence of different types of networks, reliability driven spectrum sharing is a challenging research problem. In this poster, I will present several solutions that we are currently working on to providing reliability in DSA systems. We propose quick adaptation algorithms to let spectrum users adapt to dynamics in traffic demands and topologies. We also consider proactively regulating the traffic of spectrum users to guarantee a reliability requirement. I will also discuss the impact of radio hardware's limitation to the design of our algorithms.

BIOGRAPHY:
Lili Cao is currently a PhD student in the Department of Computer Science, University of California, Santa Barbara. He received the B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science from Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China, in 2002 and 2005, respectively. His research interests include cognitive radio systems, spectrum allocation, and distributed algorithms for dynamic spectrum management.

Communication Strategies for Cognitive Radio Networks

PRESENTER
Ivana Maric
Stanford University
http://systems.stanford.edu/~ivanam/

ABSTRACT:
Cognitive radio is a wireless system that exploits side information about the channel for more efficient communications. Side information can contain knowledge about channel conditions, the activity, codebooks or messages of the other nodes. The approach of utilizing this extra knowledge is naturally expected to lead to better use of spectrum and improved network performance. We consider a building block of a network with cognitive users - a two-sender, two-receiver channel in which one encoder has extra side information. We present different regimes in which this network can operate depending on channel conditions. We show that a variety of encoding techniques - rate-splitting, Gel'fand-Pinsker coding and superposition coding becomes relevant and improves the rates. We observe gains from cooperation at the cognitive user. The obtained rates are evaluated for Gaussian channels. We discuss the impact of the causal knowledge of the side information at the cognitive encoder on these techniques. We contrast this approach to the the interweave approach in which the cognitive radio transmits in unused frequency bands. Our results bring insights into operating networks in licensed bands with primary and secondary users. They also apply to heterogeneous networks operating in unlicensed bands. Our results encourage the view of a network in which cognition is a means to enable cooperation, where all users are cognitive and use the learned side information for relaying. This will lead to more efficient cognitive systems that fully benefit from cooperative communications.

BIOGRAPHY:
Ivana Maric received her B.S. degree from the University of Novi Sad, Yugoslavia. She finished her M.S and Ph.D. in the Wireless Network Information Laboratory (WINLAB), Rutgers University in 2000 and 2006, respectively. She was a summer intern at AT&T Research Labs in 1998. She is currently a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford University. Her research focuses on network information theory and wireless communications.

Enabling MAC Protocol Implementations on Software-defined Radios

PRESENTER
Srinivasan Seshan
CMU
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~srini/

ABSTRACT:
Over the past few years a range of new Media Access Control (MAC) protocols have been proposed for wireless networks. This research has been driven by the observation that a single one-size-fits-all MAC protocol cannot meet the needs of diverse wireless deployments and applications. Unfortunately, most MAC functionality has traditionally been implemented on thewireless card for performance reasons, thus limiting the opportunities for host-based MAC customization. Software-defined radios (SDRs) promise unprecedented flexibility, but their architectural properties are likely to lead to similarly closed NIC designs that limit host control.
In this work, we identify a minimum set of core MAC functions that must be implemented close to the radio for performance and efficiency reasons. These functions include: precise scheduling in time, carrier sense, dependent packet generation, packet recognition, fine-grained radio control, and access to physical layer information. We also define an API that allows the host to control these functions, providing the necessary flexibility to implement a diverse range of MAC protocols. such as TDMA and CSMA. We have implemented this split-functionality design on the GNU Radio and USRP platform. We have built both traditional CSMA and TDMA MAC designs using this implementation to illustrate the design's effectiveness

Joint work with George Nychis, Zhuocheng Yang, Thibaud Hottelier, Srinivasan Seshan, Peter Steenkiste

BIOGRAPHY:
Srinivasan Seshan is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. He held the Finmeccanica chair at CMU from 2004 to 2006. Dr. Seshan received his Ph.D. in Computer Science in 1995 at the University of California, Berkeley. From 1995 to 2000, Dr. Seshan was a research staff member at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center. His primary interests are in the broad areas of network protocols and distributed network applications. In the past, he has worked on topics such as transport/routing protocols for wireless networks, fast protocol stack implementations, performance prediction for Internet transfers, ISP multihoming, new approaches to congestion control, large-scale multiplayer games, and large-scale sensor networks. His current work explores the challenges and opportunities created by chaotic wireless network deployments.

Optimal Transmission Strategies in Cognitive Radio Networks

PRESENTER
Xin Liu
UC Davis
http://www.cs.ucdavis.edu/~liu/

ABSTRACT:
Cognitive radio is a promising technology to mitigate spectrum shortage in wireless communications. It enables secondary users (SUs) to opportunistically access low-occupancy primary spectral bands as long as the primary user (PU) access is protected. Such a protection requirement is particularly challenging for multiple SUs over a potentially wide geographical area. We study the fundamental limit on the throughput performance of cognitive networks under the constraint of packet collision probability with the PU. We consider both perfect and imperfect sensing, and develop both centralized and distributed schemes.

BIOGRAPHY:
Xin Liu received her Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from Purdue University in 2002. She is currently an assistant professor in the Computer Science Department at the University of California, Davis. Before joining UC Davis, she was a postdoctoral research associate in the Coordinated Science Laboratory at UIUC. Her research is on wireless communication networks, with a focus on resource allocation and dynamic spectrum management. She received the Best Paper of year award of the Computer Networks Journal in 2003 for her work on opportunistic scheduling. She received NSF CAREER award in 2005 for her research on "Smart-Radio-Technology-Enabled Opportunistic Spectrum Utilization." She received the Outstanding Engineering Junior Faculty Award from the College of Engineering, University of California, Davis in 2005.

Cognitive Wireless Networks and CRM: Your Network Just Became a Teenager

PRESENTER
Marina Petrova
RWTH Aachen University
http://www.mobnets.rwth-aachen.de/index.php?id=113

ABSTRACT:
In this poster we discuss research challenges one needs to overcome to introduce intelligent methods to wireless communications. Recent research on cognitive radios has started to introduce machine learning and reasoning techniques to wireless networks. However, while these first steps with cognitive radios are certainly exciting, they have been very limited in scope, and collaborative aspects of network optimization have largely been ignored. As protection against the chaos that could ensue from the kindergarten of selfishly behaving cognitive radios, we propose a cognitive resource management (CRM) framework. Allowing for the distribution of information gathering and decision making across the network we hope to boost the collective intelligence of the system from the level of a toddler towards that of a teenager.

Our CRM is one of the first full cognitive controller architectures, and through parallel projects a full set of interfaces, such as universal link layer API, have been developed and implemented. In this poster we report on our results that indicate that cognitive systems that learn and enable cooperation are the key highly promising approaches towards increased capacity. We will also discuss the insights we have gained from running demonstrators using Genetic Algorithms and MG-based dynamic games. The demonstrators are currently extended towards full network deployments with tens of cognitive radios operating in- and outdoor environment. The work is not done only in the classical primary and secondary user context, but has been also used to extend capabilities of users operating in unlicensed bands.

BIOGRAPHY:
Marina Petrova works as a chief research scientist at the Department of Wireless Networks at the RWTH Aachen University and UMIC research centre. She graduated in Electronics and Telecommunications engineering from the University of St. Cyril and Methodius, Skopje, Macedonia. Her research interests are focused on cognitive wireless networks, cognitive radios and adaptive wireless systems technologies. The topic of her Ph.D. thesis work at the RWTH Aachen has also been the multi-parameter optimization methods for cognitive radio networks. As part of her research work she has participated in the several international cooperative projects and industry projects in the field of wireless communications and cognitive radios. In Aachen she has also lead the research work that has been done towards the prototype implementation of gnuRadio based cognitive resource manager for cognitive radio networks. She has also served in technical program and organizing committees of conferences, among those IEEE DySPAN, IEEE Crowncom, and IEEE CRNETS 2008.

Long-Term Spectrum Occupation Measurements with Novel Analysis Methods

PRESENTER
Petri M�h�nen
RWTH Aachen University
http://www.mobnets.rwth-aachen.de/index.php?id=pma_personal

ABSTRACT:
Despite the large amount of work on dynamic spectrum access relatively little is known how spectrum is actually used especially if one is considering longer time-series and collaborative spectrum sensing. In this poster we present early results from various measurement campaigns we have conducted and are still conducting in a number of different countries and environments in Europe. These measurements are done in part with several synchronized spectrum analyzers at the same time, and the longest time-series are few weeks long. We also report on new techniques we have developed to analyze and model spectrum occupancy. In particular we have worked on quantifying complexity of spectrum usage to study if white spaces in spectrum are as easy to exploit as they are sometimes claimed to be in the literature. We have also worked on spectrum modelling based on techniques from spatial statistics and stochastic geometry. We have shown that powerful methods exist for accurately modelling locations of primary and secondary users, and have also successfully applied random fields to create first-principles approaches to modeling spectrum usage.

(Joint work with Janne Riihijarvi and Matthias Wellens)

BIOGRAPHY:
Petri M�h�nen is currently a full professor and holds Ericsson Chair of Wireless Networks at the RWTH Aachen University in Germany. Before joining to RWTH Aachen in 2002, he was a research director and professor at the Centre for Wireless Communications, Finland. He has studied and worked in the United States, United Kingdom and Finland. He has been a principal investigator in several international research projects, including initiating and leading several large European Union research projects. Currently he is coordinating EU funded cognitive radio project ARAGORN and he is also a chairman of European EIFFEL study group on future internet research. M�h�nen's research interest are wireless networks & protocols, cognitive radios, wireless communications, statistical analysis methods of networks including the use of Statistical Physics inspired methodology for wireless communications. Apart of academic publishing, he is an inventor or co-inventor for over 20 patents or patent applications. Lately he has been particularly active in cognitive wireless network research and has been serving in different roles in relevant cognitive communications domain conferences, such as IEEE DySPAN, IEEE CogNet, IEEE CRNETS and CrownCom. He has been also guest-editor for several special issues in the field of cognitive radios. He is currently also a research area coordinator and one of the principal investigators for a newly formed Ultra High Speed Mobile Information and Communication (UMIC) research cluster (centre) at RWTH, which is one of the German national excellence clusters supported by the Federal Government of Germany with ca. 50M USD funding. One of the key-research domains in UMIC cluster is cognitive radio networking. He was awarded Telenor Nordic Research Prize in 2006. He is currently a member of technical advisory boards for several multinational companies and startups. He has also been a member of founding teams and served in different roles in several spin-off and start-up companies.

Practical Interference Cancellation for Wireless Networks

PRESENTER
Dan Halperin
University of Wahsington
http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/dhalperi/

ABSTRACT:
A fundamental problem with unmanaged wireless networks (like 802.11) is coordinating competing senders: either transmissions are too aggressive, causing high packet loss due to collisions, or too conservative, missing valuable transmission opportunities. In this work, we explore how to address this problem with interference cancellation, which is the ability of a single receiver to disambiguate and successfully receive simultaneous overlapping transmissions from multiple senders. I will present a practical algorithm for interference cancellation that works with unsynchronized senders and which has been prototyped on a software-defined radio platform for a Zigbee-like physical layer. I further present an experimental evaluation of our technique using this prototype on an indoor testbed with 11 wireless nodes. The results show that interference cancellation can significantly reduce packet loss rate during collisions and thus substantially increase opportunities for successful concurrent transmissions. Our techniques can benefit wireless networks in use today with simple physical layer upgrades, and looking forward provide opportunities for revisiting wireless network design.

BIOGRAPHY:
Daniel Halperin is a second year Ph. D. student in computer science and engineering at the University of Washington. He received his B.S. in computer science and mathematics from Harvey Mudd College (2006) and his M.S. at Washington (2008). His research includes wireless networking, with a current focus on next-generation technologies, and practical security and privacy in the wired and wireless, digital and physical domains. His work on implantable medical device security and privacy won the Best Paper award at the IEEE Security and Privacy conference in 2008.

Providing Reliability in Dynamic Spectrum Allocation Systems

PRESENTERS
Ying Wang
Virgina Tech
http://www.cognitiveradio.wireless.vt.edu/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=people:ywangbio

Charles Bostian
Virginia Tech
http://www.cwt.vt.edu/about/personnel/bostian.htm

Claudio da Silva
Virginia Tech
http://www.ece.vt.edu/cdasilva/

ABSTRACT:
A Cognitive Radio (CR) can usefully be aware of everything important about its environment, its user, and its own capabilities and limitations. In our CR solution, a platform independent CR system architecture is defined with a software algorithm package called a cognitive engine (CE) that includes a general radio interface. Different functional modules are defined to realize cognitive capabilities including awareness, reasoning, solution making and radio control. It is able to detect dynamically signals and open channels in the available spectrum, to provide interoperability between different types of radios operating in different bands, and to classify and demodulate signal waveforms automatically.
The demonstration includes two parts, our Public Safety Cognitive Radio (PSCR) prototype and Universal Classification and Synchronization (UCS) prototype. PSCR provides a solution to public safety interoperability using CR technology. It has scan/classify mode to perform Dynamic Spectrum Accessing (DSA), CTCSS function for departments interoperability, talk and gateway mode to provide interoperability of radios operating in different bands, and network gateway function to implement partial radio over IP. UCS has the ability to demodulate signals without benefit of any a priori information and forms the heart of a truly cognitive receiver. It interprets features from received signals and automatically executes physical layer demodulation without any a priori information about the frequency or modulation type from the transmitter side.

BIOGRAPHIES:
Ying Wang is currently a PhD student in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA. Her research interests primarily include cognitive radio network and universal classification and synchronization in cognitive radio technology. She received her Master�s degree from the University of Cincinnati in 2006 working in Wireless Communication Lab focusing on wideband and fast fading channel communication research. She received her bachelor�s degree in Information Engineering from Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China in 2003.

Charles W. Bostian is an Alumni Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of the Center of Wireless Telecommunications. He received his Ph.D, in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University and prior to joining Va Tech in 1969, he was a research engineer at Corning Glassworks and served for 2 years as a U.S. Army officer. Bostian's primary research interests are in cognitive electronics and radio system design. Currently he directs National Science Foundation (NSF), National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) projects on cognitive radio. He has authored or co-authored 45 journal and magazine articles and approximately 100 conference papers. Bostian is a Fellow of the IEEE and a member of the Virginia Tech Academy of Teaching Excellence. He is the co-author of two widely used textbooks, Solid State Radio Engineering and Satellite Communications.

Claudio da Silva received the Ph.D. degree from the University of California at San Diego in 2005 and since then has been an Assistant Professor at Virginia Tech. His research interests are on the general area of communication theory and systems. Dr. da Silva received the best student paper award at the 2003 IEEE Conference on UWB Systems and Technologies, and was a graduate student fellow of the California Institute of Telecommunications and Information Technology in 2001-2002. He is affiliated with Wireless at Virginia Tech (W@VTech).

Dynamic Spectrum Access with Portable Software Radios

PRESENTERS
Brian P. Dunn
University of Notre Dame
http://www.nd.edu/~jnl/group/brian-dunn/

J. Nicholas Laneman
University of Notre Dame
http://www.nd.edu/~jnl/

ABSTRACT:
This demo will highlight Notre Dame's portable software radio prototypes, which integrate the Ettus USRP, a small-form-factor host computer running GNU Radio, touch-screen LCD and audio interfaces, a rechargeable battery power system, and a custom case. The application software allows secondary spectrum use for packetized audio streaming between two prototypes using a dynamic spectrum access protocol based upon power detection. The protocol avoids interference with primary users, e.g., narrowband FM voice, as well as other secondary transmissions.

BIOGRAPHIES:
Brian P. Dunn is currently a Ph.D. candidate in electrical engineering at the University of Notre Dame. He received a B.S. degree from Purdue University in 2003 and a M.S. degree from the University of Notre Dame in 2005, both in Electrical Engineering. His research interests span the breadth of wireless communications --- from information theory to software radio. He has held internships with Crown Audio, the number one professional audio amplifier company, and BAE Systems, the world's third largest defense contractor. He also recently won the 2008 Notre Dame McCloskey Business Plan Competition.

J. Nicholas Laneman is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame. He earned a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, in 2002. Laneman's research interests are in wireless communications and networking, information theory, and detection and estimation. He received NSF CAREER and PECASE awards in 2006, the ORAU Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award in 2003, and the MIT EECS Harold L. Hazen Teaching Award in 2001. He is a member of IEEE, ASEE, and Sigma Xi.

Demo of WARP Platform

PRESENTERS
Scott Novich
Rice University

Ashutosh Sabharwal
Rice University
http://www.ece.rice.edu/~ashu/

ABSTRACT:
In this demonstration, we will present our preliminary foray into implementing a complete cognitive radio (CR) protocol on WARP. We will utilize 4 WARP nodes, with 2 acting as a primary (licensed link) running an 802.11-style MAC, and 2 acting as a secondary (unlicensed link) running a similar MAC, but with our cognitive modifications. The aim for the secondary flow is to maximize its network's throughput in the time domain while minimizing its affect on a primary network's traffic.

BIOGRAPHIES:
Scott Novich is a second-year graduate student in the department of Electrical & Computer Engineering at Rice University. He is a member of the Center for Multimedia Communication (CMC) research group, working under Dr. Ashutosh Sabharwal. His areas of academic interest are cognitive radio technologies and developing new peripherals and software for WARP.

Ashutosh Sabharwal received his B.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi in 1993. He graduated from The Ohio State University with a MS in 1995 and PhD in 1999. Currently he is a Professor at Rice, where he also the Director of Center for Multimedia Communication. His main research interests are information theoretic foundations, protocols and platforms for high performance wireless networks. He is the founder of WARP project (http://warp.rice.edu) and a Senior Member of IEEE.

Building High-Throughput Cognitive Networks in the Unlicensed Band

PRESENTER
Hariharan Rahul
MIT

ABSTRACT:
In this poster, we describe the design and implementation of SWIFT, a high-throughput cognitive wideband network, that coexists with unknown narrowband technologies in the unlicensed band. SWIFT has three novel components that allow it to coexist with narrowband interferers: (a) a mechanism to home in on interfering frequency bands using the backoff behavior of wireless networks, (b) a cognitive PHY layer that can operate over non-contiguous spectrum bands to present higher layers, and (c) a robust protocol that allows SWIFT nodes to agree on usable frequency bands despite uncertainty about interferers.

BIOGRAPHY:
Hariharan Rahul received his B.Tech. from the Indian Institute of Technology in 1997, and his M.S. from MIT in 1999, both in computer science. He worked at Akamai Technologies, and is currently pursuing his Ph.D. Degree in Computer Science from MIT. His research interests are in wireless networks, Internet performance measurements, and distributed systems. He has won the President of India gold medal at IIT, and the Professional Services excellence award at Akamai.

A Software-Radio UHF RFID Reader Platform

PRESENTER
Michael Buettner
University of Washington

ABSTRACT:
Passive Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) is an emerging wireless technology that allows small inexpensive computer chips to be remotely powered and interrogated for identifiers and other information. This technology is rapidly becoming pervasive, and has expanded beyond traditional supply chain applications into personal items such as credit cards, passports, and high value commercial goods. As RFID enabled items become more prevalent, particularly those using long-range UHF RFID tags, low-level research becomes increasingly important in order to improve performance and address security and privacy concerns inherent to the technology. Unfortunately, commercial solutions generally consist of black-box readers with a limited number of opaque configuration options, which inhibits such research. Towards a remedy for this situation, we have developed a software-radio based UHF RFID reader platform which allows for a high degree of flexibility with respect to both the PHY and MAC layers. This platform enables the evaluation of current RFID technology, as well as the development of new standards compliant protocols using commercial tags. In addition, when paired with the Wireless Identification and Sensing Platform (WiSP), our platform enables the development of entirely new protocols and applications.

BIOGRAPHY:
Michael Buettner is currently pursuing his Ph.D. in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at the University of Washington, and is advised by David Wetherall and Tom Anderson. He received a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and an M.S. from the University of Colorado at Boulder. His current research is focused on software-radio and RFID, but his interests encompass wireless technologies and networks in general.

Adapting Channel Widths in Wi-Fi Networks

PRESENTERS
Ranveer Chandra
Microsoft Research
/~ranveer/

Thomas Moscibroda
Microsoft Research
/~moscitho/

ABSTRACT:
The width of the spectrum over which transmitters spread their signals, or the channel width is a fundamental yet under-explored facet in wireless communication. Through detailed measurements in controlled and live environments, and using only commodity 802.11 hardware, we quantify the impact of channel width on throughput, range, and power consumption. Taken together, our findings make a strong case for wireless systems that adapt channel width. Such adaptation brings unique benefits. For instance, when the throughput required is low, moving to a narrower channel increases range and reduces power consumption; in fixed-width systems, these two quantities are always in conflict. We also present a channel width adaptation algorithm, called SampleWidth, for the base case of two communicating nodes. This algorithm is based on a simple search process that builds on top of existing techniques for adapting modulation. Per specified policy, it can maximize throughput or minimize power consumption. Evaluation using a prototype implementation shows that SampleWidth correctly identifies the optimal width under a range of scenarios. In our experiments with mobility, it increases throughput by more than 60% compared to the best fixed-width configuration.

BIOGRAPHIES:
Ranveer Chandra is a researcher in the Networking Research Group at MSR. He completed his undergraduate studies from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur and a PhD in Computer Science from Cornell University. He was the recipient of the Microsoft Graduate Research Fellowship during his PhD and his dissertation on VirtualWiFi was nominated by Cornell for the ACM Dissertation Award. VirtualWiFi has been downloaded more than 80,000 times and is the third most downloaded software ever to be released by Microsoft Research. Ranveer has authored more than 20 research papers and filed more than 25 patents. He is active in the mobile systems community, and has served in the program committee of several conferences.

Thomas Moscibroda is a researcher in the Distributed Systems and Security Research Group at MSR in Redmond. Before joining MSR, he was a member of the Distributed Computing Group of Prof. Roger Wattenhofer at ETH Zurich, completing his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in 2004 and 2006, respectively. His current research focus is in distributed computing, wireless networking, as well as algorithmic aspects of computer architecture and multi-core systems. He is an active member of these communities and has served on the program committees of various conferences. Thomas has authored more than 40 research papers at international conferences, including ACM PODC, ACM Sigcomm, ACM Mobicom, ACM Mobihoc, ACM/IEEE IPSN, IEEE Infocom, USENIX Security, ACM/IEEE ISCA, ACM/IEEE Micro, and ACM SODA, which represent the top-tier conferences in distributed computing, networking, wireless and mobile networking, communication, security, computer architecture, and algorithms. For his work, he has received best paper and presentation awards at ACM PODC, ACM Mobicom, and ACM/IEEE IPSN, and he is the recipient of two ETH Medals, for both the best Master and PhD thesis in his department.

A Cognitive Radio Framework for Home Networks

PRESENTERS
Zhou Wang, Alain Gefflaut and Andreas Steinmetzler
European Microsoft Innovation Center
http://www.microsoft.com/emic

ABSTRACT:
This demonstration is based on off-the-shelf 802.11[abg] hardware and a low cost 2.4Ghz sniffing device and shows how current WLAN based networks can benefit from spectrum awareness and dynamic access to the assigned band. The demonstrator presents a solution to the problems of inefficient radio spectrum usage and their limited ability to withstand interferences.
We developed a self-managing spectrum-aware radio management framework which provides spectrum sensing APIs to allow collection of radio spectrum usage data in real time, and then uses the collected data to opportunistically utilize the available bandwidth on the assigned spectrum by flexibly negotiating transmission parameters during connection setup. The transmission parameters (centre frequency and bandwidth) are selected based on collected spectrum usage data and application requirements. The framework continuously monitors the assigned spectrum and application behavior, and dynamically adapts to changes in the radio environment, such as interference and competition. We also support radio link mobility. A cross-media roaming mechanism is implemented to enable dynamic renegotiation of radio parameters and supports seamless handovers between different radio technologies on application level. The demonstrator uses wireless video streaming in a typical home environment as scenario to illustrate the benefits of flexible spectrum management. Although the demo is focusing on wireless streaming in 2.4GHz ISM band, the developed framework is hardware independent and can be generally applied to other frequency bands and wireless technologies. A key feature of this demonstrator is that the developed framework is running on the host processor as an integrated cross-layer architecture at system level, which includes spectrum sensing and rating, link and application monitoring as well as cross-media roaming. We believe that in order to enable better management and cohabitation of various wireless technologies the cognitive decision process controlling the RF link should be shifted to the host processor allowing cross layer optimization including network stack and application requirements.

BIOGRAPHIES:
Zhou Wang has been associated with the European Microsoft Innovation Center (EMIC) in Aachen, Germany since 2006, where he works on projects in the mobile and embedded computing domain. His current research interests include wireless networking and communication, as well as distributed systems and operating systems. Before joining EMIC, he worked at Fraunhofer IPSI in Darmstadt, Germany. He received his Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of Karlsruhe in Germany.

Alain Gefflaut has extensive knowledge in the domain of operating systems, network protocols and computer architectures. He started his career as a Post-Doc at the University of Southern California (USA) where he worked on Shared Memory Multiprocessor machines. At Siemens AG in Munich he worked on access network radio telecommunication systems based on DECT and CDMA. In 1996 he joined the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center where he worked on a network service framework and on advance research in operating system design and implementation. At Reefedge Networks, he was one of the senior architects that designed and implemented a product to secure wireless networks. This product also included innovative solutions in order to support transparent and efficient mobility solutions suitable for data as well as voice traffic. Since September 2004, he works at the EMIC where he focuses on networking issues for mobile devices. Dr. Gefflaut holds a PhD and a master degree, both in Computer Science, from the University of Rennes in France.

Andreas Steinmetzler holds a BS degree in Computer Science (Dipl.-Inf. (FH)) from Fachhochschule K�ln (University of Applied Science Cologne, 1994). Between 1994 and 2000 he held different roles for design and implementation of message passing tracing tools (still available as Intel Trace Analyser and Collector) for massive parallel computer systems. From 2000 � 2005 he served as software engineer, project and program manager in Nokia Networks IP-Router platform development, based in Mt.View CA, which was used as the base for GGSN, SGSN, LIG, Firewall and Intrusion detection product lines. In 2005 he worked in the Nokia Networks CTO Office group on the end-to-end product prototype development initiative. End of 2006 he joined the European Microsoft Innovation Center in Aachen, Germany as Program Manager and Researcher focusing on wireless networks and devices.


Panel

Can We Make Rapid Progress in the Absence of Standards?

Moderator: Petri M�h�nen (Aachen)
Panelists: John Chapin (Vanu), Joe Evans (U. Kansas), Amer Hassan (Microsoft), Jon Peha (CMU), Haiyun Tang (Adaptrum)

BIOGRAPHIES:
Petri M�h�nen is currently a full professor and holds Ericsson Chair of Wireless Networks at the RWTH Aachen University in Germany. Before joining to RWTH Aachen in 2002, he was a research director and professor at the Centre for Wireless Communications, Finland. He has studied and worked in the United States, United Kingdom and Finland. He has been a principal investigator in several international research projects, including initiating and leading several large European Union research projects. Currently he is coordinating EU funded cognitive radio project ARAGORN and he is also a chairman of European EIFFEL study group on future internet research. M�h�nen's research interest are wireless networks & protocols, cognitive radios, wireless communications, statistical analysis methods of networks including the use of Statistical Physics inspired methodology for wireless communications. Apart of academic publishing, he is an inventor or co-inventor for over 20 patents or patent applications. Lately he has been particularly active in cognitive wireless network research and has been serving in different roles in relevant cognitive communications domain conferences, such as IEEE DySPAN, IEEE CogNet, IEEE CRNETS and CrownCom. He has been also guest-editor for several special issues in the field of cognitive radios. He is currently also a research area coordinator and one of the principal investigators for a newly formed Ultra High Speed Mobile Information and Communication (UMIC) research cluster (centre) at RWTH, which is one of the German national excellence clusters supported by the Federal Government of Germany with ca. 50M USD funding. One of the key-research domains in UMIC cluster is cognitive radio networking. He was awarded Telenor Nordic Research Prize in 2006. He is currently a member of technical advisory boards for several multinational companies and startups. He has also been a member of founding teams and served in different roles in several spin-off and start-up companies.

Dr. John Chapin is Chief Scientist at Vanu, Inc. and a visiting scientist at MIT. Prior to joining Vanu, Inc., he was on the faculty of MIT in the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science department. He has responsibility for the company's research and standardization efforts in software radio and cognitive radio technologies. John serves in multiple industry leadership roles including: member of the SDR Forum Board of Directors, member of the DARPA next-generation networks research advisory panel, program committee member and tutorial chair for the DYSPAN conference. He publishes frequently on software radio technology and policy topics. In 2000, President Clinton awarded Dr. Chapin the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). In 2005 the SDR Forum honored him with the SDRF Industry Achievement award. John earned his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1997.

Joseph Evans is the Deane E. Ackers Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science at the University of Kansas (KU). He is also the Director of Research Information Technology for KU, reporting to the Vice Provost for Research. Dr. Evans served as a Program Director at the National Science Foundation (NSF) from 2003 to 2005. At NSF, he had oversight responsibility for over $70 million in multi-organizational networking research efforts in wireless networking, cybersecurity, optical networking, and scientific applications. Further, he was responsible for over $50 million in new research and infrastructure awards in newly created programs. He was a co-founder and member of the Board of Directors of NetGames USA, Inc., a network gaming company acquired by Microsoft in 2000; XBox Live, Microsoft's Internet gaming service, utilizes the company's technology. Dr. Evans has been involved in creating several other technology companies, including a start-up that has developed and deployed TIGR (Tactical Ground Reporting System) for DARPA and the US Army. He has been a researcher at the Olivetti & Oracle Research Laboratory, Cambridge University Computer Laboratory, USAF Rome Laboratories, and AT&T Bell Laboratories. Dr. Evans' recent activities include participation in the NSF Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI) effort, serving as a member of the planning group and most recently as Substrate Working Group co-chair. He has been extensively involved in cognitive radio networking research, including systems prototyping and foundational science to inform the policy debate over use of radio spectrum white spaces. Dr. Evans received the B.S.E.E. degree from Lafayette College in 1983, and M.S.E., M.A., and Ph. D. degrees from Princeton University in 1984, 1986, and 1989, respectively.

Jon M. Peha is Associate Director of the Center for Wireless and Broadband Networking at Carnegie Mellon University, and a Full Professor in the Department of Engineering & Public Policy and the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering. His research spans technical and policy issues of computer and telecommunications networks. This has included spectrum, broadband Internet, wireless networks, video and voice over IP, communications for emergency responders, universal service, secure Internet payment systems, e-commerce, and network security. He frequently consults for industry and government agencies around the world. Dr. Peha has addressed telecom and e-commerce issues on legislative staff in the US Congress, and helped launch a US Government interagency program to assist developing countries with information infrastructure. He has also served as Chief Technical Officer of three high-tech start-ups, and as a member of technical staff at SRI International, AT&T Bell Laboratories, and Microsoft. Dr. Peha is a Congressional Fellow of the IEEE and a Diplomacy Fellow of the AAAS. He holds a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from Stanford University.

Haiyun Tang received B.S. in Applied Physics from Caltech in 1996 and M.S. and Ph. D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from U. C. Berkeley in 1998 and 2002 respectively. From 2002 to 2004, he was with Advanced Technology Group at National Semiconductor working on the early development of 802.11 MIMO systems. Since 2005, he has been with Adaptrum, Inc. as its Chief Technology Officer working on cognitive radio technology and systems. He has published numerous technical papers and held several patents in communications and wireless systems areas.

 
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