Desktop-to-Desktop Gigabit per Second Wide Area Network Speed Record
Using Windows2000 tcp/ip and Commodity Hardware.

>Contacts:

>

>Jennifer Todd, Waggener Edstrom/Microsoft, jtodd@wagged.com, >  425-637-9097

>David Richardson, University of Washington, drr@u.washington.edu, >   206-543-2876

>Karen Green, NCSA/Alliance, kareng@ncsa.uiuc.edu, 217-265-0748

>Susan Brandt, ResearchTV, sbrandt@u.washington.edu, 212-414-4672

>Lisa Young, Sony Electronics, lisa.young@am.sony.com, 408-955-5683

>Jacqueline Brown, P/NWGP, jbrown@cac.washington.edu, 206-685-6238

 

>

>For info on the demo’s network aspects see: www.washington.edu/hdtv/sc99/net

and  http://research.microsoft.com/~gray/papers/Win2K_1Gbps_Press_Release.htm (this document)>

and  http://research.microsoft.com/~gray/papers/Win2K_1Gbps.doc (an overview of the 1Gbps demo)

 

>

>PORTLAND, Oregon, November 15, 1999 -- Seven high technology leaders >collaborated at SC99 today to set a number of Internet speed records, >demonstrating that long-distance gigabit-per-second networking is  >ready for prime time and that next generation Internet technologies and >capabilities are emerging in applications, in end-systems, and in >network infrastructure.

 

>

>To set the stage, at the network infrastructure level, the DARPA-sponsored >National Transparent Optical Network (NTON), the University of >Washington-led Pacific/Northwest Gigapop (P/NWGP), GST Telecommunications, and Nortel Networks >joined forces to deliver 2.4 gigabits per second (Gbps) of >packet-over-SONET based standard Internet capacity from the Microsoft >Corp. and University of Washington (UW) campuses, through a shared point >of presence at the Pacific/Northwest Gigapop in Seattle, to the SC99 >exhibition hall in Portland.

 

>

>Microsoft, the National Computational Science Alliance (Alliance), the >University of Washington (UW) and Sony (in support of the ResearchTV >consortium) demonstrated two working, real-time gigabit applications in >their coordinated SC99 exhibits.  Further, the UW, Microsoft, the Alliance >and Sony were able to run these applications concurrently, setting a >record of 2 Gbps in aggregate throughput—by a wide margin clearly the >fastest real-time applications ever run over a wide area network.

 

>

>Earlier this year, the UW and Sony were the first to demonstrate live >studio quality, High Definition Television (HDTV) broadcasts over >Internet2/Abilene. Today, in another record-breaking effort, they and the >partnership successfully transmitted a real-time gigabit HDTV stream of >five simultaneous channels of minimally-compressed, studio-quality HDTV >over the internet, using industry-standard HDTV video, ‘Wintel’ computer >systems, and networking equipment from leading vendors such as Juniper.   >Each channel within the overall stream consumed more than 200 >million-bits-per-second (Mbps), for a total of well over a >billion-bits-per-second in concurrent throughput in a state-of-the-art >real-time application.

 

>

>”More than just showing the stunning quality and immediacy that next >generation internet capabilities can bring to the desktop computers, TV’s >and HDTV’s around the world, this demonstration illustrates the >feasibility of regularly using Internet transport technology for the >real-time delivery of extraordinarily high quality video, virtual reality, >tele-medicine, and other imaging streams” said UW Vice President Ron >Johnson.  He added that the demonstration shows “it is now possible to run >distributed broadband applications over high-speed, next generation >Internet WANS using hardware and software available in the consumer >market”.  The demo used broadcast and Internet standards, Sony’s suite of >HDTV gear, off-the-shelf networking equipment, and commodity PCs with >Microsoft NT running custom high performance software the UW C&C group >developed using Microsoft Visual Studio and other tools.

 

>

>By way of comparison, the UW/Sony/ResearchTV demonstration is the >equivalent of the simultaneous transmission of the entire channel lineup >of a 150 channel cable TV system, or of 50 channels of broadcast quality >HDTV, five feature movies, or interactions among a large number of >high-resolution video walls, shared virtual realities, &/or immersive >environments. And, it shows that the internet is capable of speeds and >quality impossible to achieve with traditional broadcast technologies.

 

>

>Microsoft and the Alliance and the partners demonstrated that it is now >possible to send a gigabit-per-second TCP/IP stream from one Windows 2000 >workstation to another over a WAN.  Microsoft teamed with the Alliance’s >NT cluster development team and with the National Laboratory for Applied >Network Research (NLANR) to verify that Windows 2000 TCP/IP software >performance scales at Gbps rates on long-distance networks. This work >demonstrates speed breakthroughs in end-to-end workstation internetworking >and shows the capabilities of Windows 2000 TCP/IP.

 

>

>”Our role in NLANR is to work with application teams to help them harness >the capabilities of high performance networks,” said Larry Smarr, director >of the Alliance and NCSA, the leading-edge site for the Alliance. “Because >many of these applications involve Windows workstations, gigabit per >second performance of Windows over wide area networks is a capability that >impacts the entire high performance computing community.”

 

>

>Jim Allchin, senior vice president of the Platforms Division at Microsoft >Corp., said this demonstration showed that distributed computing over >high-speed, long-distance networks is a major part of the future for the >Windows OS.  “This exhibition shows that Windows 2000 truly is a broadband >operating system prepared for the next millennium.  Microsoft is thrilled >that Windows 2000 is able to display its gigabit-readiness through such a >tremendously innovative engineering feat.”

 

>

>Ed Lazowska, Chair of UW’s Computer Science & Engineering Department, >added that “enabling gigabit networking capabilities on what will >eventually be tens of millions of desktops is the first step >in unleashing developers worldwide to create the next generation of >applications, architectures and content.”

 

>

>Together, these collaborative demonstrations show that the era of >gigabit-per-second networking and the next generation of Internet >applications and content is at hand.

 

>

>The joint demonstrations will continue throughout the rest of SC99. For >demonstration times, visit the Alliance research booth (R300) or the joint >demo booth (RE602), or to see the demonstrations go to the UW research >booth (RE602) where the suite of coordinated demos are being run.

>About Microsoft >

>Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT”) is the worldwide leader in >software for personal and business computing. The company offers a wide >range of products and services designed to empower people through great >software - any time, any place and on any device. Microsoft and Windows >are either registered trademarks or trademarks of Microsoft Corp. in the >United States and/or other countries. Other product and company names >herein may be trademarks of their respective owners.  See http://www.microsoft.com/Windows2000.

>About the Alliance/NCSA >

>The National Computational Science Alliance is a partnership to prototype >an advanced computational infrastructure for the 21st century and includes >more than 50 academic, government and industry research partners from >across the United States. The Alliance is one of two partnerships funded >by the National Science Foundation’s Partnerships for Advanced >Computational Infrastructure (PACI) program, and receives cost-sharing at >partner institutions. NSF also supports the National Partnership for >Advanced Computational Infrastructure (NPACI), led by the San Diego >Supercomputer Center. The National Center for Supercomputing Applications >is the leading-edge site for the Alliance. NCSA is a leader in the >development and deployment of cutting-edge high-performance computing, >networking, and information technologies. The National Science Foundation, >the state of Illinois, the University of Illinois, industrial partners, >and other federal agencies fund NCSA. http://www.ncsa.uiuc.edu/

About The University of Washington (UW)

>The University of Washington is one of the world’s leading research >institutions. While the UW has great strength in a comprehensive array of >disciplines and professions in technical and non-technical realms, it is >especially well known for its world class programs in computer science and >the health sciences, and for its long and continuing role in the evolution >of the Internet, Internet messaging technologies, software agents, and >digital convergence in new media. For more information see >www.washington.edu/hdtv/sc99

>

>About ResearchTV  >

>ResearchTV is a consortium of many of the world’s leading research >institutions that is dedicated to providing greater, much more timely, and >far broader access to progress in, and the findings and outcomes of >university, government and corporate R&D efforts. In partnership with >UCAID ResearchTV also conducts core Internet2 (www.internet2.edu) >broadcast and high-speed demand video initiatives. For more information >see http://www.washington.edu/researchtv

>

>About Sony >

>Sony Electronics is the premier provider of leading-edge digital video >technology for broadcast, production and HDTV, as well as exceptional >quality consumer electronics, computer, and display products. The >University of Washington and Sony have partnered successfully to pioneer >HDTV over Internet capabilities. For more information, see >www.sony.com/professional

>

>About the Pacific/Northwest Gigapop (P/NWGP)>

>The Pacific/Northwest Gigapop is the northwest’s next generation Internet >applications cooperative, testbed, and point of presence. PNWGP connects >universities as well as research institutions and R&D enterprises >throughout Washington, Alaska, Montana, Idaho and Oregon, to one another, >to the next generation Internet backbones (including vBNS, >Internet2/Abilene and now NTON), to federal research networks, and to >super-high-performance commodity internets.  For more information, see http://>www.pnw-gigapop.net/.

>About NTON >

>The National Transparent Optical Network links government, research and >private sector labs and provides the ability to interface with most of the >broadband research networks in the U.S. NTON is a 2000 km 10-20 Gbps >Wavelength Division Multiplexed network deployed using in-place commercial >fiber. NTON provides direct access to nearly all of the major universities >on the West Coast at data rates up to, and potentially beyond, 2.5 Gbps. >For more information, see  http://www.ntonc.org