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Wolf Kienzle

I work in Human-Computer Interaction and Computer Vision.

Projects 

 

LightRing

 
  LightRing is a wearable sensor in a ring form factor that senses the 2d location of a fingertip on any surface. The device uses an infrared proximity sensor for measuring finger flexion and a 1-axis gyroscope for measuring finger rotation. LightRing tracks subtle fingertip movements from the finger base without requiring instrumentation of other body parts or the environment. This keeps the normal hand function intact and allows for socially acceptable appearance. [paper] [video] [Ken Hinckley's blog]

 

Analog Keyboard 

 
 

As touch screens are getting smaller, soft keyboards are getting harder to use. With the Analog Keyboard Project we are exploring handwriting recognition for text input on very small touch screens. We have built a prototype for Android Wear that is available for download for research purposes. [project page] [video] [download] [Ken Hinckley's blog]

 

 

Image Watch 

 
 

Image Watch is a Visual Studio extension for debugging C++ image processing code. The plug-in introduces a new watch window that displays in-memory bitmaps while your app is running, which means you no longer have to litter your code with "save-this-image-to-a-file" statements when tracking down bugs. This can be a huge time-saver, especially when debugging remotely on a tablet, phone, or wearable device. [project page on MSDN] [channel 9 interview] [//build 2013 talk] 

 

 

Handwritten Messaging 

 
  We have developed a method for composing handwritten messages and notes on a small touchscreen device. A word is entered by drawing overlapped, screen sized letters on top of each other. The system does not require gestures or timeouts to delimit characters within a word—it automatically segments the overlapping strokes and renders the message in real-time as the user is writing. Drawings may also be included with the text. [paper] [video] [Ken Hinckley's blog]

Background

I joined Microsoft in 2008 to work on handwriting recognition algorithms in Windows 7. From 2009 to 2010 I worked on web-scale learning problems in Bing. Before joining Microsoft I worked as Research Scientist in at the Max-Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems. Here's my old homepage.

I received my PhD from the University of Tübingen, Germany. My thesis is about modeling human eye movements with statistical learning methods.

Publications