Chuck Needham

Chuck Needham
MICROSOFT RESEARCH SUPPORT ENGINEER
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Projects

Kinect for Windows SDK beta

Coming later this spring, the Kinect for Windows SDK is a programming toolkit that will enable researchers and enthusiasts easy access to the capabilities offered by the Microsoft Kinect device connected to computers running Microsoft Windows 7.

 

 

Microsoft Tag

 Microsoft Tag connects real life with the digital world. Microsoft Tags are small, colorful codes that can be printed, stuck, or displayed just about anywhere. When you snap a Tag with the camera on your internet-enabled phone, additional information or experiences are automatically opened on your phone. There is no fumbling with URLs or texting short codes. Microsoft Tags can make product packages, posters, print-based ads, magazine articles, exhibit signage, billboards, storefronts, business card, or just about anything else, interactive.

Songsmith

Songsmith

Songsmith generates musical accompaniment to match a singer’s voice. Just choose a musical style, sing into your PC’s microphone, and Songsmith will create backing music for you. Then share your songs with your friends and family, post your songs online, or create your own music videos.

 

WorldWide Telescope

WorldWide Telescope

The WorldWide Telescope (WWT) is a rich visualization environment that functions as a virtual telescope, bringing together imagery from the best ground- and space-based telescopes in the world to enable seamless, guided explorations of the universe. 

 

 

 

People
Angel, Tambie
Angel, Tambie

Carbary, Tony
Carbary, Tony

Chandrasekaran, Nirupama
Chandrasekaran, Nirupama

Choudhury, Piali
Choudhury, Piali

Edelman Pelton, Alicia
Edelman Pelton, Alicia

Eversole, Adam
Eversole, Adam

Hart, Ted
Hart, Ted

Hughes, Richard
Hughes, Richard

Johnston, David
Johnston, David

Marriott, Ian
Marriott, Ian

Moeur, Robin
Moeur, Robin

Olynyk, Kirk
Olynyk, Kirk

Paradiso, Ann
Paradiso, Ann

Personal Web Site

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Research News
Downloads
  • The R2 Probabilistic Programming Tool
    The R2 Probabilistic Programming Tool is a research project within the Programming Languages and Tools group at Microsoft Research on probabilistic programming. Our goal is to build a user friendly and scalable probabilistic programming system by employing powerful techniques from language design, program analysis and verification.
  • Fast subroutines for Matlab programs
    This library provides highly optimized versions of primitive functions such as repmat, set intersection, and gammaln. It provides efficient random number generators and evaluation of common probability densities. It provides routines for counting floating-point operations (FLOPS), useful for benchmarking algorithms. There are also some useful utilities such as filename globbing and parsing of variable-length argument lists.
  • Microsoft Research Storage Toolkit
    The Microsoft Research Storage Toolkit enables effective and accessible research in Software Defined Storage by adding I/O classification functions to the Windows 8.1 storage stack and exposing selected flows of I/O requests to a user-supplied program written in C# which can easily inspect or modify them. Parts of the Toolkit have supported our own recent research efforts, including IoFlow (SOSP13) and VDC (OSDI14), and we are releasing the Toolkit as a contribution to the academic community in the hope of facilitating and encouraging further advances in Software Defined Storage.
  • T2 Temporal Prover
    T2 is designed to prove safety and liveness properties of programs, expressed as reachability, termination, or in the temporal logic CTL. Also see, https://github.com/mmjb/T2.
  • Pitch Change Toolbox
    This Matlab toolbox implements the pitch-change algorithm described by Slaney, Shriberg and Huang in their Interspeech 2013 paper “Pitch-gesture modeling using subband autocorrelation change detection.” Calculating speaker pitch (or f0) is typically the first computational step in modeling tone and intonation for spoken language understanding. Usually pitch is treated as a fixed, single-valued quantity. The inherent ambiguity of judging the octave of pitch, as well as spurious values, leads to errors in modeling pitch gestures that propagate in a computational pipeline. This toolbox implements an alternative that instead measures changes in the harmonic structure using a subband autocorrelation change detector (SACD). This approach builds upon new machine-learning ideas for how to integrate autocorrelation information across subbands. Importantly however, for modeling gestures, we preserve multiple hypotheses and integrate information from all harmonics over time.