Colloquia, Seminars, and Special Events

As part of our open research environment, Microsoft Research New England is pleased to continue the academic tradition of hosting colloquia, seminar series, and special events that contribute to the intellectual commons. We welcome members of the local academic community to join us.

  • Microsoft Research Colloquium
    The Microsoft Research Colloquium at Microsoft Research New England focuses on research in the foundational aspects of computer science, mathematics, economics, anthropology, and sociology. With an interdisciplinary flavor, this colloquium series features some of the foremost researchers in their fields talking about their research, breakthroughs, and advances. Open to the local academic community.
  • Game Theory & Computation Seminar Series
    The Game Theory and Computation Seminar is a weekly theory seminar series, highlighting recent advances in economic theory and computer science. The range of topics includes algorithmic game theory, market design, microeconomic theory, social network theory, and other topics related to game theory and computation. The agenda typically consists of a prepared presentation, followed by a brief Q&A. The seminar is aimed at an audience of theory researchers and students. We welcome members of the local academic community to attend.
  • Joint Combinatorics Seminar with MIT
    The twice-weekly Combinatorics Seminar is jointly sponsored with the MIT Mathematics Department. Typically held Wednesdays at 4 PM at MIT and Fridays at 4 PM at Microsoft Research, mid-September through mid-May.
  • Computational Biology Seminar Series
    An occasional forum for delivering academic computational biology talks.
  • Public Lectures
    Microsoft Research New England will occasionally host public lectures of broad interest. We welcome those interested to attend. No registration will be necessary.
Video Archive of Other Occasional MSR Seminars
Departing Glances: A Sociotechnical Account of “Leaving” Grindr
Departing Glances: A Sociotechnical Account of “Leaving” Grindr
Jed Brubaker
20 June 2012
The Degree of Segregation in Social Networks
The Degree of Segregation in Social Networks
Nicole Immorlica
5 April 2012
Computational Perspectives on Social Phenomena in On-Line Networks
Computational Perspectives on Social Phenomena in On-Line Networks
Jon Kleinberg
7 December 2011
Interpreting the Community: Information Practices and/for Deviance
Interpreting the Community: Information Practices and/for Deviance
Jessica Lingel
15 August 2011
Information and Interactive Communication
Information and Interactive Communication
Mark Braverman
10 February 2011
The Reconstruction Problem on the Tree
The Reconstruction Problem on the Tree
Allan Sly
8 February 2011
Reputational Bargaining Under Knowledge of Rationality
Reputational Bargaining Under Knowledge of Rationality
Alexander Wolitzky
31 January 2011
The Mathematics of Side-Channel Attacks
The Mathematics of Side-Channel Attacks
Nadia Heninger
28 January 2011
Efficient Bayesian Algorithmic Mechanism Design
Efficient Bayesian Algorithmic Mechanism Design
Brendan Lucier
24 January 2011
Limit Theorems in Pseudorandomness and Learning Theory
Limit Theorems in Pseudorandomness and Learning Theory
Raghu Meka
20 January 2011
Extracting Knowledge from Networks: Rumors, Superstars, and Communities
Extracting Knowledge from Networks: Rumors, Superstars, and Communities
Tauhid Zaman
19 January 2011
Cryptography with Weak, Noisy, Leaky and Tempered Keys
Cryptography with Weak, Noisy, Leaky and Tempered Keys
Daniel Wichs
17 January 2011
Generalized Identity-Based Encryption
Generalized Identity-Based Encryption
Mike Hamburg
14 January 2011
Optimization under Uncertainty: Understanding the Correlation Gap
Optimization under Uncertainty: Understanding the Correlation Gap
Shipra Agrawal
11 January 2011
PCPs and the Hardness of Generating Private Synthetic Data
PCPs and the Hardness of Generating Private Synthetic Data
Jonathan Ullman
19 November 2010
MSR New England Social Media Research
MSR New England Social Media Research
Amelia Abreu, Andres Monroy Hernandez, and Omar Wasow
7 September 2010
Computational Social Science in Medicine
Computational Social Science in Medicine
Abraham Flaxman
23 August 2010
Why Social Computing Is So Hard: The Social-Technical Gap Between Technically Working and Socially Workable
Why Social Computing Is So Hard: The Social-Technical Gap Between Technically Working and Socially Workable
Mark Ackerman
10 August 2010
Text and Tie Strength
Text and Tie Strength
Karrie Karahalios
9 April 2010
When Quantity makes Quality: Learning with Information Constraints
When Quantity makes Quality: Learning with Information Constraints
Ohad Shamir
25 February 2010
Adverse Selection and Switching Costs in Health Insurance Markets: When Nudging Hurts
Adverse Selection and Switching Costs in Health Insurance Markets: When Nudging Hurts
Ben Handel
12 February 2010
Dynamics of Information Exchange in Endogenous Social Networks
Dynamics of Information Exchange in Endogenous Social Networks
Kostas Bimpikis
9 February 2010
The Unique Games Conjecture and Graph Expansion
The Unique Games Conjecture and Graph Expansion
David Steurer
2 February 2010
Twice-Ramanujan Sparsifiers
Twice-Ramanujan Sparsifiers
Nikhil Srivastava
15 January 2010
The Asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problem
The Asymmetric Traveling Salesman Problem
Shayan Gharan Oveis
8 December 2009
Blackbox Polynomial Identity Testing for Depth 3 Circuits
Blackbox Polynomial Identity Testing for Depth 3 Circuits
Shubhangi Saraf
1 December 2009

Where

Microsoft Research New England
First Floor Conference Center
One Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA

Arrival Guidance

Upon arrival, be prepared to show a picture ID and sign the Building Visitor Log when approaching the Lobby Floor Security Desk. Alert them to the name of the event you are attending and ask them to direct you to the appropriate floor. Typically the talks are located in the First Floor Conference Center, however sometimes the location may change.