Agenda

2010 Microsoft Research eScience Workshop

Monday, October 11

Time 

Event 

 

 

 

9:30–12:00 


 

Tutorial MT1 

Microsoft Biology Foundation: An Open-Source Library of Re-usable Bioinformatics Functions and Algorithms Built on the .NET Platform

Abstract

Webcast

Tutorial MT2 

Scientific Data Visualization using WorldWide Telescope

Abstract

Webcast

Tutorial MT3 

Data-Intensive Research: Dataset Lifecycle Management for Scientific Workflow, Collaboration, Sharing, and Archiving

Abstract

Webcast

Tutorial MT4 

Parallel Computing with Visual Studio 2010 and the .NET Framework 4

Abstract

Webcast

1:00–1:15

Welcome

1:15–2:15

Monday Keynote Presentation

UK e-Science: a Jewel or a Thousand Flowers
Malcolm Atkinson, e-Science Institute
The global digital revolution provides a fertile and turbulent ecological environment in which e-Science is a small but vital element. There is a deep history of e-Science, but coining the term and injecting leadership and modest funds had a huge impact. A veritable explosion of activity has led to a global burst of new e-Science species. Our challenge is to understand what will enable them to thrive and yield maximum benefit as the digital revolution continues to be driven by commerce and media.

Webcast

2:45–3:45

Session MA1

Senses Across Scales

Webcast

Session MA2

Data Analysis Through Visualization

Webcast

Session MA3

Health & Wellbeing I

Webcast

 

Exploration of Real-Time Provenance-Aware Virtual Sensors Across Scales for Studying Complex Environmental Systems
Yong Liu, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Abstract

 

Development and Application of Network of Geosensors for Environmental Monitoring
Rafael Santos, INPE – Brazilian National Institute for Space Research

Abstract

BLAST Atlas: A Function-Based Multiple Genome Browser
Lawrence Buckingham, Queensland University of Technology

Abstract

 

DIVE: A Data Intensive Visualization Engine
Dennis Bromley, University of Washington

Abstract

 

Simplifying Oligonucleotide Primer Design Software to Keep Pace with an Ever Increasing Demand for Assay Formats
Kenneth "Kirby" Bloom, Illumina Corporation

Abstract

 

 

Integration of Sequence Analysis into Third Dimension Explorer Leveraging the Microsoft Biology Framework
Jeremy Kolpak, Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson

Abstract

 

3:45–4:45

Session MA5

From Environmental Science to Public Policy

Webcast

Session MA6

Complex Biological Systems in Action

Webcast

Session MA7

Data-Intensive Science

Webcast

 

Session MA8

Health & Wellbeing II

Webcast

 

Achieving an Ecosystem Based Approach to Planning in the Puget Sound

Stephen Stanley, Washington Department of Ecology

Abstract

 

Adapting Environmental Science Methods to Public Policy and Decision Support
Rob Fatland, Microsoft Research 

Abstract

 

An Interactive Modeling Environment for Systems Biology of Aging
Pat Langley, Arizona State University 

Abstract

 

Analyzing the Process of Knowledge Dynamics in Sustainability Innovation: Towards a Data-Intensive Approach to Sustainability Science
Masaru Yarime, University of Tokyo

Abstract

 

Data-Intensive Science for Safety, Trust, and Sustainability

Shuichi Iwata, The University of Tokyo 

Abstract

BL!P: A Tool to Automate NCBI BLAST Searches and Customize the Results for Exploration in Live Labs Pivot
Vince Forgetta, McGill University

Abstract

 

GenoZoom: Browsing the genome with Microsoft Biology Foundation, Deep Zoom, and Silverlight
Xin-Yi Chua, Queensland University of Technology

Abstract

4:45–5:30

No pre-planned workshop activities

5:30–9:00

Reception and dinner
Jim Gray eScience Award Presentation
This year, Microsoft Research presents the Jim Gray eScience Award to a researcher who has made an outstanding contribution to the field of data-intensive computing. The award—named for Jim Gray, a Technical Fellow for Microsoft Research and a Turing Award winner who disappeared at sea in 2007—recognizes innovators whose work truly makes science easier for scientists.

Webcast

Making Open Science Real
Adam Bly, Seed
The future of science is open, not because it ought to be but because it needs to be. Today, science's potential is hindered by the disconnected nature of the world's scientific information and the closed architecture of science itself. So how do we get from here to there? How can technology make open science real?

Webcast

 

Tuesday, October 12

Time 

Event 

9:00–10:00

Tuesday Keynote Presentation
The Reaming of Life

Philip Bourne, University of California, San Diego
Anyone can punch a hole in a piece of metal, but a reamer is needed to accurately size and finish that hole. Digital computers are the reamers of life, bringing together a vast array of disparate bits of data to provide an accurate picture of life that can be smoothly transcended across scales—from molecules to populations. Sounds heady, so why do we not fully understand the molecular basis of cancer? Why can’t we accurately model the impact of an oil spill on marine life? Why can’t we decide whether there is a tree of life or a network of life? "Well tonight we are going to sort it all out, for tonight it’s the reaming of life."

Webcast

10:00–11:00

 

Session TM1

Data from Ocean to Stars

Webcast

Session TM2

Health & Wellbeing III

Webcast

Session TM3

Tools to Get Science Done

Webcast

 

Data, Data, Everywhere, nor Any Drop to Drink: New Approaches to Finding Events of Interest in High Bandwidth Data Streams
Mark Abbott, Oregon State University

Abstract

 

Extreme Database-centric Computing in Science
Alex Szalay, Johns Hopkins University 

Abstract

Model-Driven Cloud Services for Cancer Research
Marty Humphrey, University of Virginia

Abstract

 

Cloud-Based Map-Reduce Architecture for Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Based Metabolomics
Paul Anderson, Wright State University 

Abstract

MyExperimentalScience, Extending the “Workflow”

Jeremy Frey, University of Southampton

Abstract

 

The Conversion Software Registry

Michal Ondrejcek, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Abstract

11:00–12:00

 

Session TM5

Cloud Computing and Chemistry

Webcast

Session TM6

Health & Wellbeing IV

Webcast

Session TM7

Database Diversity

Webcast

 

oreChem: Planning and Enacting Chemistry on the Semantic Web

Mark Borkum, University of Southampton

Abstract

 

Accelerating Chemical Property Prediction with Cloud Computing

Hugo Hiden, Newcastle University 

Abstract

Remote Computed Tomography Reconstruction Service on GPU-Equipped Computer Clusters Running Microsoft HPC Server 2008
Timur Gureyev, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO)

Abstract

 

e-LICO: Delivering Data Mining to the Life Science Community

Simon Jupp, University of Manchester 

Abstract

SQL is Dead; Long Live SQL: Lightweight Query Services for Ad Hoc Research Data
Bill Howe, University of Washington

Abstract

 

SinBiota 2.0 – Planning a New Generation Environmental Information System
João Meidanis, University of Campinas 

Abstract

1:30–3:00

Session TA1

Enabling Scientific Discovery

Webcast

Session TA2

Health & Wellbeing V

Webcast

Session TA3

Virtual Research Environments and Collaboration

Webcast

Session TA4

Applications in Digital Humanities

Webcast

Enhancing the Quality and Trust of Citizen Science Data
Jane Hunter, The University of Queensland

Abstract

 

Scientist-Computer Interfaces for Data-Intensive Science
Cecilia Aragon, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 

Abstract

 

Enabling Scientific Discovery with Microsoft SharePoint

Kenji Takeda, University of Southampton

Abstract

Genome-Wide Association of ALS in Finland
Bryan Traynor, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health

Abstract

 

A Framework for Large-Scale Modelling of Population Health

John Ainsworth, University of Manchester

Abstract

 

GREAT.stanford.edu: Generating Functional Hypotheses from Genome-Wide Measurements of Mammalian Cis-Regulation
Gill Bejerano, Stanford University

Abstract

Medici: A Scalable Multimedia Environment for Research
Joe Futrelle, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Abstract

 

BlogMyData: A Virtual Research Environment for Collaborative Visualization of Environmental Data
Andrew Milsted, University of Southampton

Abstract

 

RightField: Rich Annotation of Experimental Biology Through Stealth Using Spreadsheets
Matthew Horridge, University of Manchester

Abstract

musicSpace: Improving Access to Musicological Data
mc schraefel, University of Southampton

Abstract

 

Quantifying Historical Geographic Knowledge from Digital Maps
Tenzing Shaw, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Abstract

 

Data Intensive Research in Computational Musicology
David De Roure, Oxford e-Research Centre 

Abstract

3:30–4:30

Session TA5

Agriculture, Digital Watersheds and Heterogeneous Climate Data

Webcast

Session TA6

Health & Wellbeing VI

Webcast

Session TA7

eScience in Systems

Webcast

Session TA8
Archaeo Informatics

 

Scaling Information on ‘Biosphere Breathing’ from Chloroplast to the Globe
Dennis Baldocchi, University of California-Berkeley

Abstract

 

Agrodatamine: Integrating Analysis of Climate Time Series and Remote Sensing Images

Humberto Razente, UFABC

Abstract

Correction for Hidden Confounders in Genetic Analyses 
Jennifer Listgarten, Microsoft Research

Abstract

 

BioPatML.NET and Its Pattern Editor: Moving into the Next Era of Biology Software
James Hogan, Queensland University of Technology

Abstract

GRAS Support Network, Its Implementation, Operation, and Use
Fritz Wollenweber, EUMETSAT

Abstract

 

Data Intensive Frameworks for Astronomy
Jeffrey Gardner, University of Washington 

Abstract

Experiences and Visions on Archaeo Informatics
Christiaan Hendrikus van der Meijden, IT group, Veterinary Faculty, Ludwig Maximilians University; Peer Kröger, Hans-Peter Kriegel, Department of Computer Science Database Systems Group, Ludwig Maximilians University

Abstract

4:45–6:00

Poster Session

 

Wednesday, October 13

Time

Event

 

 

 

8:30–10:00

 

Session WM2

Challenges of Data Standards & Tools

Webcast

Session WM3

Data and Visualization

Webcast

Session WM4

Health & Wellbeing VII

Webcast

 

Panel: Challenges of Data Standards and Tools
Deb Agarwal, LBNL/UCB; Bill Howe, University of Washington; Alex James, Microsoft; Yong Liu, National Center for Supercomputing Applications, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Maryann Martone, UCSD; Yan Xu, Microsoft Research

Abstract

Scientific Data Sharing and Archiving at UC3/CDL: the Excel Add-in Project and More
John Kunze, California Digital Library/California Curation Center; Tricia Cruse, California Digital Library/California Curation Center

Abstract

 

Visualizing All of History with Chronozoom
David Shimabukuro, University of California-Berkeley; Roland Saekow, University of California-Berkeley

Abstract

Proteome-Scale Protein Isoform Characterization with High Performance Computing
Jake Chen, Indiana University

Abstract

 

Answering Biological Questions by Querying k-Mer Databases
Paul Greenfield, CSIRO Mathematics, Informatics and Statistics

Abstract

 

 
10:00–11:45  Closing Keynote Presentations

10:00–10:30

OpenSource & Microsoft: Beyond Interoperability
Sam Ramji, Apigee
Microsoft's open source strategy has shifted over the years, from ignore to fight to interoperate. Recently they have changed course to use open source as an engine of innovation and growth for core businesses. This talk will cover details of projects that showcase the shifts in strategy and expose the underlying dynamics of open source in the software industry.

Webcast

10:30–11:45

Scaling the Science
Garrison Sposito, U.C. Berkeley; Mark Stacey, U.C. Berkeley; Stephanie Carlson, U.C. Berkeley; Charlotte Ambrose, NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service; James Hunt, U.C. Berkeley
The current opportunities in the physical and biological sciences and their technological applications require the means to fundamentally understand processes at the molecular scale and to extend those processes to predict performance at larger scales. As examples, material science is using resolution at the scale of an atom to predict and design devices that are orders of magnitude larger, and biological processes are dictated by interactions at molecular, cellular, organismal, population, and ecosystem levels. Spatial and temporal scaling across orders of magnitude requires analysis tools that are available for computation, aggregation, and visualization. eScience is developing approaches for conducting this scaling and has been essential in addressing fundamental questions in biology and astronomy. While additional applications remain in the basic sciences, these fields have demonstrated pathways for advances in the applied environmental and social sciences, where the linkages between scales and disciplines require focused contributions from the eScience community. This workshop provides opportunities to observe how eScience has provided the scaling across various fields and to explore some of the challenges that remain.

Webcast

Close of 2010 Microsoft Research eScience Workshop

1:00–3:30


 

Tutorial WT1

CoSBiLab: Enabling Simulation-Based Science

Abstract

Webcast

 

Tutorial WT2

Scientific Data Visualization using WorldWide Telescope 

Abstract

Webcast

 

Tutorial WT3

Data-Intensive Research: Dataset Lifecycle Management for Scientific Workflow, Collaboration, Sharing, and Archiving

Abstract

Webcast

Tutorial WT4

OData – Open Data for the Open Web

Abstract

Webcast

3:30  Event concludes