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Workshop on Computational Education for Scientists

The 2007 Workshop on Computational Education for Scientists provided a unique opportunity to discuss, learn, and influence the development of an interdisciplinary computational education standard.

Overview |   Agenda   |   Attendees   |   Presentations   |   Position Papers

Overview

Rapid advances in computational technologies have dramatically changed the practice of research in both the computing and scientific domains. Inherently, interdisciplinary problems open new opportunities for researchers in computer science and sciences such as biomedicine, biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, and other disciplines. These problems present new challenges for science educators to innovate and create new curricula to prepare the upcoming generation of computational scientists.  

The Workshop on Computational Education for Scientists provided a unique opportunity to discuss, learn, and influence the development of an interdisciplinary computational education standard. Participants explored challenges, pedagogy, and assessment in computational education. By providing a forum for scientists and educators to share their experience, expertise, and expectations with the wider academic and research communities, this workshop helped facilitate effective multi-disciplinary collaboration for science education, stimulate breakthroughs in curriculum and pedagogy design, and affect decision makers in order to adopt curriculum innovation in both the scientific and computing communities. Our goal is to help the students take advantage of the true power of computing and become more successful in their own fields with computational thinking.

Call for Position Papers

Paper submission deadline was September 7, 2007.

We invited every attendee to submit a one-page position paper; and we were looking for contributions in the following areas:

  • Identification of:
    - Problems in which computation helps students understand key concepts
    - Computational commonalities in education among science disciplines
    - Educational approaches that differentiate computational thinking from computing
  • Case studies of computational thinking that address:
    - The conceptual difference between scientific abstraction and computing abstraction
    - The process of turning science abstraction into computer software
    - The transformation from observational science to experimental science
  • Pedagogical strategies that enable effective integration of computing with science education:
    - Create multi-disciplinary environment in classroom
    - Using real-world scientific research challenges to stimulate computational thinking
    - Create better scientists not by increasing the number of required credits
  • Education assessment for interdisciplinary curricula innovation