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Case studies: Microsoft Azure for Research

Learn about some of the ways that people are using the power of Microsoft Azure for data-driven computing in the cloud. If you are using Microsoft Azure for a cloud-based research project and would like to share your story, please contact azurerfp@microsoft.com.

Preventing flood disasters with Cortana Intelligence Suite 

Preventing flood disasters with Cortana Intelligence Suite 

Researchers from the University of Texas collaborated with other researchers, federal agencies, commercial partners, and first responders to create the National Flood Interoperability Experiment (NFIE), and used Microsoft Azure & Cortana Intelligence Suite to build a prototype for a national flood data-modeling and mapping system. Read more... 

 

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Intelligent cloud computing lifts villages out of water poverty

Intelligent cloud computing lifts villages out of water poverty

A team from the University of Oxford hopes to lift five million people in rural Africa and Asia from water-related poverty by linking smart water-pumps to the cloud. Cortana Intelligence Suite is empowering project partners including UNICEF to monitor the health of water systems at regional scale. Read more…

 

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Untangling airports using open source tools on Microsoft Azure

Untangling airports using open source toosl on Microsoft Azure

Scientists from the University of Stirling and University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom tackled the knotty problem of delays on airport taxiways, where planes are entering or leaving runways. Sandy Brownlee, PhD, and Jason Atkin, PhD, collaborated with Manchester Airport to use Azure for Research to model the complex data from many airports worldwide. Read more…

 

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Saving shellfish harvest by predicting ocean chemistry

Ocean temperatures and chemistry are changing dramatically and posing a risk to certain life forms, including shellfish like oysters grown and harvested in Washington state. Microsoft Research teamed up with University of Washington scientists to take data from a complex modeling system run on supercomputers and bring it to the cloud. Read more...

 

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Using RaaS to predict hospital readmission rates

Using RaaS to predict hospital readmission rates

A cloud-based platform developed by the University of Washington Tacoma's Center for Data Sciences uses a wide range of anonymous clinical and administrative data to help hospitals reduce the likelihood of patient readmission and increase healthier outcomes. Called RaaS (Readmission Score as a Service), the platform uses hundreds of machine learning models, developed by using R and Microsoft Azure Machine Learning. Read more...

 

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Cloud computing helps researchers predict traffic jams

Cloud computing helps researchers predict traffic jams

The Traffic Prediction Project plans to combine all available traffic data—including both historic and current information gleaned from transportation departments, Bing traffic maps, road cameras and sensors, and the social networks of the drivers themselves—to create a solution that helps motorists avoid traffic jams. Read more...

 

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Coping with floods—of water and data

Coping with floods—of water and data

Researchers from the University of Texas partnered with other researchers, federal agencies, and first responders to create the National Flood Interoperability Experiment (NFIE). They used Microsoft Azure to build a new national flood data-modeling and mapping system with the potential to provide life- and cost-saving information to the public. Read more…

 

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Understanding cloud forests through the power of cloud computing

Understanding cloud forests through the power of cloud computing

The Brazilian Cloud Forest Sensing Project is studying how cloud forests function in response to climatic variability. The project deployed more than 700 sensors connected to the Internet of Things through Microsoft Azure and is gathering integrated data on physical and biological processes within the study site. Read more…

 

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Eco-testing a building before it is even built

Buildings Go Green...in the Cloud

New civil engineering tools that take advantage of the power of cloud computing on Microsoft Azure have the potential to reduce the time and cost of energy-efficient building by allowing in-depth simulations of a building’s performance during the design phase. Read more…

 

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Cloud computing unlocks drug discovery

Helping scientists discover new drugs

Toxicity prediction presents a great challenge to scientists developing new drugs; the massive data analysis requirements require a costly computer infrastructure. But with Microsoft Azure, scientists can analyze big data affordably and quickly—in the cloud. Read more…

 

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Fighting wildfires with data

Fighting Wildfires with Data  The University of the Aegean in Greece developed a new application—featuring Bing Maps, Microsoft Silverlight, and Microsoft Azure—to determine the daily wildfire risk in Lesvos during its dry season. With the help of a daily visualization of the environmental factors, the island’s fire management team uses the app to determine resource allocation for the day. Read more… 

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A new tool for teaching climate change in the cloud

Using ChronoZoom to build a comprehensive timeline of climate change in the cloud

A professor explores the history of climate change in depth in his graduate-level Earth System Science class. To help students visualize events through the ages, he is using ChronoZoom, an open-source community project dedicated to visualizing the history of everything. ChronoZoom stores and processes data in the cloud (through Microsoft Azure). Read more...

 

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Supercomputing on demand with Microsoft Azure 

Searching for genetic causes of disease 

Learn how Microsoft Azure can simplify the management of large-scale computations and how, together with FaST-LMM—an algorithm developed by Microsoft Research—it drastically reduced processing times to find new associations between genomes and diseases. Read more... 

 

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