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Workshop on Quantum Algorithms and Devices - Part 2

Speaker  Robert Schoelkopf and David Reilly

Affiliation  Yale University, University of Sydney

Host  Krysta Svore

Duration  01:30:23

Date recorded  16 July 2014

10:50AM – 11:30AMUsing Cat States in a Microwave Cavity for Quantum Information Rob Schoelkopf (Yale University)

Abstract: Dramatic progress has been made in the last decade and a half towards realizing solid-state systems for quantum information processing with superconducting quantum circuits. Artificial atoms (or qubits) based on Josephson junctions have improved their coherence times more than 100,000-fold, have been entangled, and used to perform simple quantum algorithms. The next challenge for the field is demonstrating quantum error correction that actually improves the lifetimes, a necessary step for building more complex systems. I will describe recent experiments with superconducting circuits, where we store quantum information in the form of Schrodinger cat states of a microwave cavity, containing up to 100 photons. Using an ancilla qubit, we then monitor the gradual death of these cats, photon by photon, by observing the first jumps of photon number parity. This represents the first continuous observation of a quantum error syndrome, and may enable new approaches to quantum information based on photonic qubits.

10:50AM – 11:30AMUsing Cat States in a Microwave Cavity for Quantum Information Rob Schoelkopf (Yale University)

Abstract: Dramatic progress has been made in the last decade and a half towards realizing solid-state systems for quantum information processing with superconducting quantum circuits. Artificial atoms (or qubits) based on Josephson junctions have improved their coherence times more than 100,000-fold, have been entangled, and used to perform simple quantum algorithms. The next challenge for the field is demonstrating quantum error correction that actually improves the lifetimes, a necessary step for building more complex systems. I will describe recent experiments with superconducting circuits, where we store quantum information in the form of Schrodinger cat states of a microwave cavity, containing up to 100 photons. Using an ancilla qubit, we then monitor the gradual death of these cats, photon by photon, by observing the first jumps of photon number parity. This represents the first continuous observation of a quantum error syndrome, and may enable new approaches to quantum information based on photonic qubits.

12:10AM – 1:10PMLunch

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> Workshop on Quantum Algorithms and Devices - Part 2