The social and economic implications of mobile telephony in Rwanda: An ownership/access typology

Jonathan Donner

Abstract

In Jonathan Donner's study of Rwandan users, the mobile phone is an expensive and treasured item, used in the main by small individual businessmen and women, where it has the power to expand the horizons of their business and open up their workplace and work schedule, allowing them to organise their work effectively in a way previously unthinkable. In one case documented by Donner, a small restaurateur is able to develop, via the mobile phone, the kind of simple 'just-in-time' stock control management and delivery techniques that large corporations spend millions on IT systems and consultancy to replicate at their scale. At either end of the scale, the business impact of the technology is simple, and is experienced by both Donner's Rwandan restaurateur and large multinational corporations alike. The technology provides a freedom to move through time and space and stay connected to the business, to make decisions for the business, and to run the business according to an ever-changing micro-schedule.

Details

Publication typeArticle
Published inKnowledge, Technology, and Policy
URLhttp://www.metapress.com/content/9kakkl4qlkcx9dw0/?p=5c8e8d1d32724b58914748d34ccaafa9&pi=1
Pages17-28
Volume19
Number2
PublisherSpringer-Verlag
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