Stirring up experience through movement in game play: Effects on engagement and social behaviour

The recent development of controllers designed around natural body movements has altered the nature of gaming and contributed towards it being marketed as a more social activity. The study reported here compares the use of Donkey Konga bongos with a standard controller to examine how affording motion through an input device affects social interaction. Levels of engagement with the game were also measured to explore whether increases in social behaviour in the ‘real world’ would result in reduced involvement with the ‘game world’. Social interaction was significantly higher when the bongos were used, but this did not detract from engagement. Instead, engagement was also found to increase when body movement was afforded.

p511-lindley.pdf
PDF file

In  Proceedings of the 2008 SIGCHI conference on Human Factors in computing systems

Publisher  Association for Computing Machinery, Inc.
Copyright © 2007 by the Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. Abstracting with credit is permitted. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post on servers, or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee. Request permissions from Publications Dept, ACM Inc., fax +1 (212) 869-0481, or permissions@acm.org. The definitive version of this paper can be found at ACM’s Digital Library --http://www.acm.org/dl/.

Details

TypeInproceedings
URLhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1145/1357054.1357136
Pages511-514
> Publications > Stirring up experience through movement in game play: Effects on engagement and social behaviour