Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Share on LinkedIn Share by email
Our research
Content type
+
Downloads (461)
+
Events (467)
 
Groups (151)
+
News (2815)
 
People (718)
 
Projects (1136)
+
Publications (12922)
+
Videos (5994)
Labs
Research areas
Algorithms and theory47205 (360)
Communication and collaboration47188 (236)
Computational linguistics47189 (258)
Computational sciences47190 (245)
Computer systems and networking47191 (809)
Computer vision208594 (933)
Data mining and data management208595 (140)
Economics and computation47192 (124)
Education47193 (89)
Gaming47194 (84)
Graphics and multimedia47195 (250)
Hardware and devices47196 (226)
Health and well-being47197 (102)
Human-computer interaction47198 (978)
Machine learning and intelligence47200 (984)
Mobile computing208596 (79)
Quantum computing208597 (41)
Search, information retrieval, and knowledge management47199 (737)
Security and privacy47202 (357)
Social media208598 (83)
Social sciences47203 (300)
Software development, programming principles, tools, and languages47204 (656)
Speech recognition, synthesis, and dialog systems208599 (159)
Technology for emerging markets208600 (58)
1–25 of 300
Sort
Show 25 | 50 | 100
1234567Next 
Debaleena Chattopadhyay, Kenton O'Hara, Sean Rintel, and Roman Rädle

Slide presentations have long been stuck in a one-to-many paradigm, limiting audience engagement. Based on the concept of smartphone-based remote control of slide navigation, we present Office Social—a PowerPoint plugin and companion smartphone app that allows audience members qualified access to slides for personal review and, when the presenter enables it, public control over slide navigation. We studied the longitudinal use of Office Social across four meetings of a workgroup. We found that...

Publication details
Date: 1 May 2016
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM – Association for Computing Machinery
Munmun De Choudhury, Emre Kıcıman, Mark Dredze, Glen Coppersmith, and Mrinal Kumar

History of mental illness is a major factor behind suicide risk and ideation. However research efforts toward characterizing and forecasting this risk is limited due to the paucity of information regarding suicide ideation, exacerbated by the stigma of mental illness. This paper fills gaps in the literature by developing a statistical methodology to infer which individuals could undergo transitions from mental health discourse to suicidal ideation. We utilize semi-anonymous support communities on Reddit...

Publication details
Date: 1 May 2016
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM – Association for Computing Machinery
Charles Kiene, Andrés Monroy-Hernández, and Benjamin Mako Hill
Publication details
Date: 1 May 2016
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM – Association for Computing Machinery
Sean Rintel, Richard Harper, and K enton O’Hara

This paper reports on how asynchronous mobile video messaging presents users with a challenge to doing ‘being ordinary’. 53 participants from three countries were recruited to try Skype Qik at launch for two weeks. Some participants embraced Skype Qik as a gift economy, emphasizing a special relationship enacted through crafted self-presentation. However, gift exchange makes up only a small proportion of conversation. Many participants struggled with the self-presentation obligations of video when...

Publication details
Date: 1 May 2016
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM – Association for Computing Machinery
Pablo J. Barrio, Daniel G. Goldstein, and Jake M. Hofman

How many guns are there in the United States? What is the incidence of breast cancer? Is a billion dollar budget cut large or small? Advocates of scientific and civic literacy are concerned with improving how people estimate and comprehend risks, measurements, and frequencies, but relatively little progress has been made in this direction. In this article we describe and test a framework to help people comprehend numerical measurements in everyday settings through simple sentences, termed perspectives,...

Publication details
Date: 1 May 2016
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Travis Martin, Jake M. Hofman, Amit Sharma, Ashton Anderson, and Duncan J. Watts

How predictable is success in complex social systems? In spite of a recent profusion of prediction studies that exploit online social and information network data, this question remains unanswered, in part because it has not been adequately specified. In this paper we attempt to clarify the question by presenting a simple stylized model of success that attributes prediction error to one of two generic sources: insufficiency of available data and/or models on the one hand; and inherent unpredictability...

Publication details
Date: 1 April 2016
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Mary L. Gray, Siddharth Suri, Syed Shoaib Ali, and Deepti Kulkarni

The main goal of this paper is to show that crowdworkers collaborate to fulfill technical and social needs left by the platform they work on. That is, crowdworkers are not the independent, autonomous workers they are often assumed to be, but instead work within a social network of other crowdworkers. Crowdworkers collaborate with members of their networks to 1) manage the administrative overhead associated with crowdwork, 2) find lucrative tasks and reputable employers and 3) recreate the social...

Publication details
Date: 1 February 2016
Type: Article
Fernando Diaz, Michael Gamon, Jake Hofman, Emre Kıcıman, and David Rothschild

There is a large body of research on utilizing online activity as a survey of political opinion to predict real world election outcomes. There is considerably less work, however, on using this data to understand topic-specific interest and opinion amongst the general population and specific demographic subgroups, as currently measured by relatively expensive surveys. Here we investigate this possibility by studying a full census of all Twitter activity during the 2012 election cycle along with the...

Publication details
Date: 5 January 2016
Type: Article
Publisher: PLOS – Public Library of Science
Number: 1
Dan Goldstein, Hal E. Hershfield, and Shlomo Benartzi

Research on choice architecture is shaping policy around the world, touching on areas ranging from retirement economics to environmental issues. Recently, researchers and policy makers have started to pay more attention not just to choice architecture but also to information architecture: the format in which information is presented to people. Here, we investigate information architecture as it applies to consumption in retirement. Specifically, in three experiments, we examine how people react to lump...

Publication details
Date: 1 December 2015
Type: Article
Sean Rintel, Daniel Angus, and Richard Fitzgerald

During the 2011 UK public sector protests, controversy ignited over the “Miliband Loop”, an unedited video from a pool interview showing Labour leader Ed Miliband to have provided largely the same answer in response to six questions. The interviewer subsequently complained in a TwitLonger that the incident epitomized the clash of public relations and journalism. In this paper we unpack the practical production of the pool interview as a delamination of the interview-as-lived from the...

Publication details
Date: 17 November 2015
Type: Article
Publisher: Elsevier
Yoram Bachrach

Online social networks have changed the ways in which people communicate and interact, and have also impacted the business landscape. One recent trend is firms using online social networks as a part of the job hiring process. Firms scrutinize potential employees using their social network profiles, sometimes even seeking access to restricted parts of the profile, for example by demanding applicants to hand over their passwords.

We explore the key criteria and profile components that affect...

Publication details
Date: 1 October 2015
Type: Article
Publisher: ACM – Association for Computing Machinery
Yoad Lewenberg, Yoram Bachrach, and Svitlana Volkova

We examine the relation between the emotions users express on social networks and their perceived areas of interests, based on a sample of Twitter users.

Our methodology relies on training machine learning models to classify the emotions expressed in tweets, according to Ekman’s six high-level emotions. We then used raters, sourced from Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, to examine several Twitter profiles and to determine whether the profile owner is interested in various areas, including sports, movies,...

Publication details
Date: 1 October 2015
Type: Article
Publisher: ACM – Association for Computing Machinery
Akane Sano, Paul Johns, and Mary Czerwinski

We developed a feedback-loop, user-tailored advice system to provide stress interventions and advice about improving sleep, diet, and exercise habits at the workplace. Thirty participants joined a 2 week study: in the first week, we collected their behaviors about sleep, diet, exercise and stress levels using Fitbit and surveys. During the second week we continued monitoring, and based on the participants’ measurements in the previous days, we also provided interventions and advice during the workday,...

Publication details
Date: 1 September 2015
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACII 2016: Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, 2015 International Conference on
Akane Sano, Paul Johns, and Mary Czerwinski

We developed a feedback-loop, user-tailored advice system to provide stress interventions and advice about improving sleep, diet, and exercise habits at the workplace. Thirty participants joined a 2 week study: in the first week, we collected their behaviors about sleep, diet, exercise and stress levels using Fitbit and surveys. During the second week we continued monitoring, and based on the participants' measurements in the previous days, we also provided interventions and advice during the workday,...

Publication details
Date: 1 September 2015
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACII 2016: Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, 2015 International Conference on
Anonymous ACII submission, Yuliya Lutchyn, Paul Johns, Mary Czerwinski, Shamsi Iqbal, Gloria Mark, and Akane Sano

Despite a long history and a large volume of affective research, measuring affective states is still a non-trivial task that is complicated by numerous conceptual and methodological decisions that the researcher has to make. We suggest that inconsistent results reported in some areas of research can be partially explained by the choice of measurements that capture different manifestations of affective phenomena, or focus on different elements of affective processes. In the present study we examine one...

Publication details
Date: 1 September 2015
Type: Inproceeding
Etan Green, Justin M Rao, and David M Rothschild

We conduct field and laboratory experiments on the same panel of experts, measuring the internal consistency of their predictions 1) in the field, in their domain of expertise, and 2) on a conceptually identical laboratory exercise. Experts make internally consistent predictions in the field, both in absolute terms and relative to a panel of novices, but they exhibit markedly less consistency on the isomorphic lab exercise. Possible explanations for this fading expertise include low motivation in the...

Publication details
Date: 1 September 2015
Type: Article
, Yuliya Lutchyn, Paul Johns, Asta Roseway, and Mary Czerwinski

Accurate and timely assessment of collective emotions in the workplace is a critical managerial task. However, perceptual, normative, and methodological challenges make it very difficult even for the most experienced organizational leaders. In this paper we present a MoodTracker - a technological solution that can help to overcome these challenges, and facilitate a continuous monitoring of the collective emotions in large groups in real-time. The MoodTracker is a program that runs on any PC device, and...

Publication details
Date: 1 September 2015
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACII 2016: Affective Computing and Intelligent Interaction, 2015 International Conference on
Liwen Xu, Xiaohong Hao, Nicholas D. Lane, Xin Liu, and Thomas Moscibroda

Mobile crowdsourcing is a powerful tool for collecting data of various types. The primary bottleneck in such systems is the high burden placed on the user who must manually collect sensor data or respond in-situ to simple queries (e.g., experience sampling studies). In this work, we present Compressive CrowdSensing (CCS) – a framework that enables compressive sensing techniques to be applied to mobile crowdsourcing scenarios. CCS enables each user to provide significantly reduced amounts of manually...

Publication details
Date: 1 September 2015
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM – Association for Computing Machinery
Daniel Preotiuc-Pietro, Svitlana Volkova, Vasileios Lampos, Yoram Bachrach, and Nikolaos Aletras

Automatically inferring user demographics from social media posts is useful for both social science research and a range of downstream applications in marketing and politics. We present the first extensive study where user behaviour on Twitter is used to build a predictive model of income. We apply non-linear methods for regression, i.e. Gaussian Processes, achieving strong correlation between predicted and actual user income. This allows us to shed light on the factors that characterise income on...

Publication details
Date: 1 September 2015
Type: Article
Publisher: PLOS – Public Library of Science
A. Schein, J. Paisley, D. Blei, and H. Wallach

We present a Bayesian tensor factorization model for inferring latent group structures from dynamic pairwise interaction patterns. For decades, political scientists have collected and analyzed records of the form “country i took action a toward country j at time t” known as dyadic events in order to form and test theories of international relations. We represent these event data as a tensor of counts and develop Bayesian Poisson tensor factorization to infer a low dimensional, interpretable...

Publication details
Date: 1 August 2015
Type: Inproceeding
Hanif Baharin, Stephen Viller, and Sean Rintel

SonicAIR is an ambient awareness technology probe designed to explore how connecting the soundscapes of friends or family members might reduce the isolation of seniors living independently. At its core, SonicAIR instruments kitchen activity sites to produce an always-on real-time aural representation of remote domestic rhythms. This paper reports how users in two pilot SonicAIR deployments used the sounds as resources for recognizing comfortable narratives of sociability. Used alongside telecare...

Publication details
Date: 1 July 2015
Type: Article
Publisher: ACM – Association for Computing Machinery
Sharad Goel, Ashton Anderson, Jake Hofman, and Duncan J. Watts

Viral products and ideas are intuitively understood to grow through a person-to-person diffusion process analogous to the spread of an infectious disease; however, until recently it has been prohibitively difficult to directly observe purportedly viral events, and thus to rigorously quantify or characterize their structural properties. Here we propose a formal measure of what we label “structural virality” that interpolates between two conceptual extremes: content that gains its popularity through a...

Publication details
Date: 1 July 2015
Type: Article
Number: 1
Jelte Mense, Paul I. Palmer, and Matthew J. Smith

Western Europe has experienced several large riots over the last decade (2005-2015), such as the Paris riots in 2005, the London riots in 2011 and the Stockholm riots in 2013. Such acts of civil violence generally lead to big social and economic costs. Being able to quantitatively describe riots can aid current understanding of the underlying mechanisms, and potentially help to identify and mitigate risks associated with these events. We describe a general agent-based model of riots and demonstrate how...

Publication details
Date: 9 June 2015
Type: Proceedings
Publisher: Springer
Amit Sharma, Jake M. Hofman, and Duncan J. Watts

Recommendation systems are an increasingly prominent part of the web, accounting for up to a third of all traffic on several of the world’s most popular sites. Nevertheless, little is known about how much activity such systems actually cause over and above activity that would have occurred via other means (e.g., search) if recommendations were absent. Although the ideal way to estimate the causal impact of recommendations is via randomized experiments, such experiments are costly and may inconvenience...

Publication details
Date: 1 June 2015
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Helen J. Wang, Alexander Moshchuk, Michael Gamon, Mona Haraty, Shamsi Iqbal, Eli T. Brown, Ashish Kapoor, Chris Meek, Eric Chen, Yuan Tian, Jaime Teevan, Mary Czerwinski, and Susan Dumais

In this paper, we advocate “activity” to be a central abstraction between people and computing instead of applications. We outline the vision of the activity platform as the next-generation social platform.

Publication details
Date: 8 May 2015
Type: Technical report
Publisher: Microsoft Research
Number: MSR-TR-2015-38
1–25 of 300
Sort
Show 25 | 50 | 100
1234567Next 
> Our research