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Algorithms and theory47205 (208)
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John Downs, Nicolas Villar, James Scott, Sian Lindley, John Helmes, and Gavin Smyth
We present Picco, a tiny situated display for drawings and simple animations, which are created on a dedicated tablet app. Picco was designed to support playful messaging in the workplace through a glanceable desktop device that would place minimal demands on users. Two studies of the device at work demonstrated how crafting was an expression of intimacy when the device was used to connect the workplace to the home, and a way of demonstrating skill and humor to a broad audience when messages were sent...
Publication details
Date: 21 June 2014
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Andrew Begel, Thomas Fritz, Sebastian Mueller, Serap Yigit-Elliott, and Manuela Zueger
Software developers make programming mistakes that cause serious bugs for their customers. Existing work to detect problematic software focuses mainly on post hoc identification of correlations between bug fixes and code. We propose a new approach to address this problem — detect when software developers are experiencing difficulty while they work on their programming tasks, and stop them before they can introduce bugs into the code. In this paper, we investigate a novel approach to classify the...
Publication details
Date: 4 June 2014
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: International Conference on Software Engineering
Taku Hachisu and Masaaki Fukumoto
(Abstract is not disclosed until the conference starts)
Publication details
Date: 26 April 2014
Type: Proceedings
Publisher: ACM
eric chung, andreas nowatzyk, tom rodeheffer, chuck thacker, and fang yu
In this paper, we present AN3—a low-cost, circuit-switched datacenter network. AN3 replaces expensive IP switches with custom hardware that supports circuit-based switching efficiently and with low cost. AN3 is enabled by a new speculative transmission protocol that (1) enables rapid multiplexing of links to efficiently support many flows in a datacenter-scale computer, and (2) establishes setup and teardown of circuits within tens of microseconds—well below the TCP handshake delay. In simulations, AN3...
Publication details
Date: 12 March 2014
Type: Technical report
Number: MSR-TR-2014-35
James Bornholt, Todd Mytkowicz, and Kathryn S. McKinley
Emerging applications increasingly use estimates such as sensor data (GPS), probabilistic models, machine learning, big data, and human data. Unfortunately, representing this uncertain data with discrete types (floats, integers, and booleans) encourages developers to pretend it is not probabilistic, which causes three types of uncertainty bugs. (1) Using estimates as facts ignores random error in estimates. (2) Computation compounds that error. (3) Boolean questions on probabilistic data induce false...
Publication details
Date: 1 March 2014
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (ASPLOS)
Todd Mytkowicz, Madanlal Musuvathi, and Wolfram Schulte
A finite-state machine (FSM) is an important abstraction for solving several problems, including regular-expression matching, tokenizing text, and Huffman decoding. FSM computations typically involve data-dependent iterations with unpredictable memory-access patterns making them difficult to parallelize. This paper describes a parallel algorithm for FSMs that breaks dependences across iterations by efficiently enumerating transitions from all possible states on each input symbol. This allows the algorithm...
Publication details
Date: 1 March 2014
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems (ASPLOS)
Xin Liu and Jiawei Gu
We are proposing a new system to enhance the tactile experience of digital painting hat includes multi-strokes for different painting needs. In this paper, we describe how FlexStroke is used as a Chinese brush, an oil brush, and a crayon by changing the jamming tip. This tip has different levels of stiffness based on its jamming structure. Visual simulations on PixelSense[3] jointly enhance the intuitive painting process with realistic display results.
Publication details
Date: 16 February 2014
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Saeed Maleki, Madanlal Musuvathi, and Todd Mytkowicz
This paper proposes an efficient parallel algorithm for an important class of dynamic programming problems that includes Viterbi, Needleman-Wunsch, Smith-Waterman, and Longest Common Subsequence. In dynamic programming, the subproblems that do not depend on each other, and thus can be computed in parallel, form stages or wavefronts. The algorithm presented in this paper provides additional parallelism allowing multiple stages to be computed in parallel despite dependences among them. The correctness and...
Publication details
Date: 1 February 2014
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM SIGPLAN Symposium on Principles and Practice of Parallel Programming (PPoPP)
Adam Paetznick and Krysta M. Svore
We present a non-deterministic circuit decomposition technique for approximating an arbitrary single-qubit unitary to within distance epsilon that requires significantly fewer non-Clifford gates than deterministic decomposition techniques. We develop "Repeat-Until-Success" (RUS) circuits and characterize unitaries that can be exactly represented as an RUS circuit. Our RUS circuits operate by conditioning on a given measurement outcome and using only a small number of non-Clifford gates and ancilla qubits....
Publication details
Date: 1 November 2013
Type: Article
Aiden Doherty, Wilby Williamson, Melvyn Hillsdon, Steve Hodges, Charlie Foster, and Paul Kelly
BACKGROUND: The growing global burden of noncommunicable diseases makes it important to monitor and influence a range of health-related behaviours such as diet and physical activity Wearable cameras appear to record and reveal many of these behaviours in more accessible ways. However, having determined opportunities for improvement, most health-related interventions fail to result in lasting changes. AIM: To assess the use of wearable cameras as part of a behaviour change strategy and consider ethical...
Publication details
Date: 1 November 2013
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Guillaume Duclos-Cianci and Krysta M. Svore
An important task required to build a scalable, fault-tolerant quantum computer is to efficiently represent an arbitrary single-qubit rotation by fault-tolerant quantum operations. Traditionally, the method for decomposing a single-qubit unitary into a discrete set of gates is Solovay-Kitaev decomposition, which in practice produces a sequence of depth O(\log^c(1/\epsilon)), where c~3.97 is the state-of-the-art. The proven lower bound is c=1, however an efficient algorithm that saturates this bound is...
Publication details
Date: 17 October 2013
Type: Article
Publisher: American Physical Society
Number: 042325
Ivan Tashev
Kinect is a device for human-machine interaction, which adds two more input modalities to the palette of the user interface designer: gestures and speech. Kinect is transforming how people interact with computers, kiosks, and other motion-controlled devices from fun applications like playing a virtual violin, to applications in health care and physical therapy, retail, education, and training. The Kinect for Windows SDK and toolkit contain drivers, tools, APIs, device interfaces, and code samples to...
Publication details
Date: 1 September 2013
Type: Article
Publisher: IEEE
Yoshihiro Kawahara, Steve Hodges, Benjamin S. Cook, Cheng Zhang, and Gregory D. Abowd
This paper introduces a low cost, fast and accessible technology to support the rapid prototyping of functional electronic devices. Central to this approach of ‘instant inkjet circuits’ is the ability to print highly conductive traces and patterns onto flexible substrates such as paper and plastic films cheaply and quickly. In addition to providing an alternative to breadboarding and conventional printed circuits, we demonstrate how this technique readily supports large area sensors and high frequency...
Publication details
Date: 1 September 2013
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing
Arvind Arasu, Ken Eguro, Raghav Kaushik, Donald Kossmann, Ravi Ramamurthy, and Ramarathnam Venkatesan
The scalability and availability of cloud computing makes it an ideal platform for many database applications. However, it is challenging to secure sensitive client information in a practical and rigorous manner against both external attackers and curious cloud administrators. In this paper, we describe a novel secure FPGA-based query coprocessor and discuss how it can be tightly integrated with a commercial database system such as SQL Server. This combination, called Cipherbase, leverages efficient...
Publication details
Date: 1 September 2013
Type: Proceedings
Katie Derthick, James Scott, Nicolas Villar, and Christian Winkler
We describe the SAWUI architecture by which smartphones can easily show user interfaces for nearby appliances, with no modification or pre-installation of software on the phone, no reliance on cloud services or networking infrastructure, and modest additional hardware in the appliance. In contrast to appliances’ physical user interfaces, which are often as simple as buttons, icons and LEDs, SAWUIs leverage smartphones’ powerful UI hardware to provide personalized, self-explanatory, adaptive, and localized...
Publication details
Date: 1 August 2013
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Alex Bocharov, Yuri Gurevich, and Krysta M. Svore
We develop the first constructive algorithms for compiling single-qubit unitary gates into circuits over the universal V basis. The V basis is an alternative universal basis to the more commonly studied {H,T} basis. We propose two classical algorithms for quantum circuit compilation: the first algorithm has expected polynomial time (in precision log(1/epsilon)) and offers a depth/precision guarantee that improves upon state-of-the-art methods for compiling into the {H,T} basis by factors ranging from 1.86...
Publication details
Date: 12 July 2013
Type: Article
Publisher: American Physical Society
Number: 012313
Paul Pham and Krysta M. Svore
We present a 2D nearest-neighbor quantum architecture for Shor's factoring algorithm in polylogarithmic depth. Our implementation uses parallel phase estimation, constant-depth fanout and teleportation, and constant-depth carry-save modular addition. We derive asymptotic bounds on the circuit depth and width of our architecture and provide a comparison to all previous nearest-neighbor factoring implementations.
Publication details
Date: 1 July 2013
Type: Article
Publisher: Rinton Press
Number: 11&12
Krysta M. Svore, Matthew B. Hastings, and Michael Freedman
We develop several algorithms for performing quantum phase estimation based on basic measurements and classical post-processing. We present a pedagogical review of quantum phase estimation and simulate the algorithm to numerically determine its scaling in circuit depth and width. We show that the use of purely random measurements requires a number of measurements that is optimal up to constant factors, albeit at the cost of exponential classical post-processing; the method can also be used to improve...
Publication details
Date: 1 April 2013
Type: Article
Publisher: Rinton Press
Number: 3&4
Steve Hodges, James Scott, Sue Sentance, Colin Miller, Nicolas Villar, Scarlet Schwiderski-Grosche, Kerry Hammil, and Steven Johnston
In this paper we present the features of a new physical device prototyping platform called Microsoft .NET Gadgeteer along with our initial experiences using it to teach computer science in high schools. Gadgeteer makes it easy for newcomers to electronics and computing to plug together modules with varied functionality and to program the resulting system's behavior. We believe the platform is particularly suited to teaching modern programming concepts such as object-oriented, event-based programming and it...
Publication details
Date: 1 March 2013
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Mastooreh Salajegheh, Bodhi Priyantha, and Jie Liu
Mobile wallets promise to allow people to easily manage their accounts and to carry less cards. However, the slow adoption of contactless point of sales (POS) terminals by merchants limits the potential of Near-Field Communication (NFC) based payment devices. In this paper, we discuss Wild Card, a secure and backward compatible way to make mobile payment through conventional magnetic stripe based POS terminals. The device resembles a traditional credit card in its physical dimensions and stays in...
Publication details
Date: 1 March 2013
Type: Technical report
Publisher: Microsoft Technical Report
Number: MSR-TR-2013-61
Ivan Tashev and Malcolm Slaney
Audio signal enhancement often involves the application of a time-varying filter, or suppression rule, to the frequency-domain transform of a corrupted signal. Classic approaches use rules derived under Gaussian models and interpret them as spectral estimators in a Bayesian statistical framework. This mathematical approach provides rules that satisfy certain optimization criteria – maximum likelihood, mean square error, etc. In this paper we propose to learn the suppression rule from a representative...
Publication details
Date: 14 February 2013
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: University of California - San Diego
Steve Hodges, Stuart Taylor, Nicolas Villar, James Scott, and John Helmes
In this paper we present a number of different physical construction techniques for prototyping functional electronic devices. Some of these approaches are already well established whilst others are more novel; our aim is to briefly summarize some of the main categories and to illustrate them with real examples. Whilst a number of different tools exist for building working device prototypes, for consistency the examples we present here are all built using the Microsoft .NET Gadgeteer platform. Although...
Publication details
Date: 1 February 2013
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: ACM
Steve Hodges, Stuart Taylor, Nicolas Villar, James Scott, Dominik Bial, and Patrick Tobias Fischer
Tools like Microsoft .NET Gadgeteer offer the ability to quickly prototype, test, and deploy connected devices, providing a key element that will accelerate our understanding of the challenges in realizing the Internet of Things vision.
Publication details
Date: 1 February 2013
Type: Article
Publisher: IEEE Computer Society
Pan Hu, Guobin Shen, Liqun Li, and Donghuan Lu
We present ViRi -- an intriguing system that enables a user to enjoy a frontal view experience even when the user is actually at a slanted viewing angle. ViRi tries to restore the front-view effect by enhancing the normal content rendering process with an additional geometry correction stage. The necessary prerequisite is effectively and accurately estimating the actual viewing angle under natural viewing situations and under the constraints of the device's computational power and limited battery...
Publication details
Date: 1 January 2013
Type: Proceedings
Publisher: ACM International Conference in Mobile Systems, Applications, and Services (MobiSys)
N. Pittman, A. Forin, A. Criminisi, J. Shotton, and A. Mahram
Image segmentation is the process of partitioning an image into segments or subsets of pixels for purposes of further analysis, such as separating the interesting objects in the foreground from the un-interesting objects in the background. In many image processing applications, the process requires a sequence of computational steps on a per pixel basis, thereby binding the performance to the size and resolution of the image. As applications require greater resolution and larger images the computational...
Publication details
Date: 1 January 2013
Type: Inproceeding
Publisher: IEEE
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